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Sick Of It All - Outtakes For The Outcast (Cover Artwork)

Sick Of It All

Sick Of It All: Outtakes For The OutcastOuttakes For The Outcast (2004)
Fat Wreck Chords

Reviewer Rating: 3.5
User Rating:


Contributed by: adamAdam
(others by this writer | submit your own)

The fact that Outtakes For The Outcast sounds like such a solid, singular piece of work says one of two things: either Sick Of It All's maintained a consistent level of quality over the years, even on their b-sides, or Sick Of It All really hasn't shifted out of the same gear in their entire career..
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The fact that Outtakes For The Outcast sounds like such a solid, singular piece of work says one of two things: either Sick Of It All's maintained a consistent level of quality over the years, even on their b-sides, or Sick Of It All really hasn't shifted out of the same gear in their entire career. I'd argue in favour of the former view, and for that reason this is a rarities compilation that would impress even fair-weather fans of the band.

Sick Of It All have avoided the typical pitfalls of the rarities compilation. This means that studio material that was buried for a reason is still buried, and what's on the record is all quite interesting stuff. They've also forgone the usual chronological ordering of these records and have sequenced Outtakes quite well. What results is a record that, despite featuring material from 1992 to present, flows quite nicely and never loses the listener's attention (not that a band like Sick Of It All really had that problem to begin with).

Along with hard hitting original cuts like "I Believe" and "Stood For Nothing," there's a number of interesting covers included here. You're treated to two Sham 69 tunes, classics from the Misfits and Husker Du and a resurrection of a song by 80s Oi act The Last Resort. All of these are well done, but their renditions of tunes like "Borstal Breakout" really hammer home the tangible connection between Sick Of It All's NYC hardcore sound and the punk roots of the style. Of course the inclusion of the Oi / punk covers show the band in a slightly less heavy, less metallic path than they've taken in recent years, but there's never a moment where the SOIA's own style and personality don't make the songs their own.

The record includes live versions of "Never Measure Up" and "The Future Is Mine," both from the shows where their well-received Live In A Dive record was recorded. The album wraps up on a surprising note, with a formerly bootleg House Of Pain remix of "Just Look Around." It was wise to leave this to the end, as DJ Lethal's hip-hop would have severely killed the momentum mid-album, but it's an amusing way to cap off such a commendably filler-free and to the point b-sides record.

 

 
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Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not respon sible for them in any way. Seriously.
Anonymous (September 20, 2005)

people who talk shit on "thugcore" just dont get it either, sorry, but you'll never understand the lower east side and queens from the 70s to early 90s, the lyrics are real life, not bitching about breaking edge in the suburbs

Anonymous (September 20, 2005)

people who dont like sick of it all are bad people , period

Anonymous (October 27, 2004)

Yeah dude, cause if i cared about my "cred" I'd really be posting comments on an internet site under my real name.

My very existence on this site makes me a poser...just like you.

-Ken

Anonymous (October 26, 2004)

This review gave that Ken guy the opportunity to name drop Argentinian bands that no one cares about.

Anonymous (October 26, 2004)

"My question is (and I'm sure BSD will give me a hundred answers) what makes this style of music so damn popular?"

SOIA isn't thug-core. They're more of an Oi-influenced extension of crossover. Hatebreed, Madball, Throwdown, etc., I don't understand their popularity, either.

Maybe because (like Black Sabbath), the music is easy to play and the lyrics aren't trying to be spooky (instead opting for the white trash jock mentality, which is a lot more appealing to the lowest common denominator than politics).

-BSD

boldredletters (October 26, 2004)

Ken-

I wouldn't lump SOIA in with all those other bands, for which there is no answer. SOIA actually has some socially relevant lyrics, and a style of their own, and have been playing since the 80s. Madball and Hatebreed just suck on pretty much every level.

Anonymous (October 26, 2004)

anyone remember those lagwagon t-shirts back in the day that had that dude with the mohawk and a kilt and the NYHC logo but it said NRHC (not really hardcore)?

i'm not a big fan of that band but htat shit made me giggle

-the other scott-

Anonymous (October 26, 2004)

You know - I just don't get the popularity of this style of music.

Case in point:

When I was down in Argentina this summer, the most popular form of punk was the NYHC / Thug sXe scene which had merged together. Bands like SOIA and Hatebreed were all the rage down there, and lyrically they seem to focus on "crews" and the perils of street life.

The local bands (Otra Salida, SAC, etc) mimic the style and lyrical content of the NYHC bands but really don't touch on important local issues that matter - especially in a country as crippled with problems as Argentina.

Argentina has a great group of hardcore bands that stylistically are just as fast and hard but don't enjoy the same worship as the NYHC bands have, but have political lyrics about real issues at stake in the country and world at large. I couldn't believe how few people down there knew of Migra Violenta, who sing about the impacts of Global trade and ask serious questions about the political violence of years past, but could name off every member of Madball.

My question is (and I'm sure BSD will give me a hundred answers) what makes this style of music so damn popular?

-Ken

Anonymous (October 26, 2004)

im ''sick of all of this'' .... roots blah blah blah

how many times can this be done and get respect . i downloaded some mp3's and quickly deleted them . not worth my hardrive and not worth my money .

Anonymous (October 25, 2004)

"what the hell was that
|
V"

That was a lame attempt at being clever.

Anonymous (October 24, 2004)

what the hell was that
|
V

Anonymous (October 24, 2004)

sick of it all

more like suck at it all

snap

Anonymous (October 23, 2004)

SOIA= best live band... ever.

SOIA= one of the best bands... ever.

Anonymous (October 23, 2004)

"To the guy below me:

You're a fag.

Yep, that's it."

you should try masturbating, it will make you a lot less angry

Anonymous (October 23, 2004)

"I was just reading a comment by Ian MacKaye about how Sham 69 influenced all the DC hardcore bands"

Most east coast hardcore (especially the shout-along stuff) is just a faster, tougher version of British punk. Have you ever seen the picture of Ian when he was in the Teen Idles, wearing a leather jacket and a Sex Pistols shirt?

-BSD

jamespastepunk (October 23, 2004)

To the guy below:

How obvious can you get with your flamebait?

KB (October 23, 2004)

sucks. The only redeeming value to this crap is the hip hop remix of "Just Look Around" that was remixed by DJ Lethal and House of Pain (even though they kind of suck too).

Anonymous (October 23, 2004)

For all Denali fans: http://www.diwmagazine.com/builder.htm

Anonymous (October 23, 2004)

Live versions of songs on studio albums suck.

-Chinatown

Cos (October 23, 2004)

I was just reading a comment by Ian MacKaye about how Sham 69 influenced all the DC hardcore bands... Hey guys, you should post my "We Got the Neutron Bomb" review. More punk rock book reviews are forthcoming!

--Cos

Anonymous (October 22, 2004)

SOIA doing a Husker Du cover!? It appears my "twenty" has a date with destiny.

-ObeyYourParents

Anonymous (October 22, 2004)

To the guy below me:

You're a fag.

Yep, that's it.

Anonymous (October 22, 2004)

i always thought of sick of it all as the last repsectable hardcore band, then they name this shit "outtakes for the outcast" how fucking cheesy is that shit...sounds like a good charlotte fan club or some shit

yep, that's it

Anonymous (October 22, 2004)

SOIA is so fucking great... i'm picking this one tonight after work...

FortyMinutesWest (October 22, 2004)

Yeah, their cover of Target is great.

TheOneTrueBill (October 22, 2004)

I absolutly love how they re-did the Husker song all hardcore style.

poopypants (October 22, 2004)

wheres my muthafuckin D4/NMB drunken review?

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