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Sex Pistols

Sex Pistols: Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols (1977)
Sex Pistols

Reviewer Rating: 5
User Rating:


Contributed by: BSDBSD
(others by this writer | submit your own)

With success came acceptance, and the accepted was no longer dangerous. It's weird to think about how in the mid-70's the Ramones were probably the fastest, loudest band in the world. What we now recognize as the standard punk song was then a revolution for the new wave of rock song writers. A gr.
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With success came acceptance, and the accepted was no longer dangerous.

It's weird to think about how in the mid-70's the Ramones were probably the fastest, loudest band in the world. What we now recognize as the standard punk song was then a revolution for the new wave of rock song writers. A group of four homely, suburban New York kids funnelled the energy of early 60's rock through their musical ineptitude, creating a clearer extension of the Velvet Underground sound that was at once fun, catchy and somewhat atonal.

A year after the Ramones formed, in Britain, another band of this sort would crop up and play a role just as important in creating the noisiest genre of music ever. Using the same simplistic, catchy music as its base, their lyrics were the most cohesively vile and hate-filled to ever be presented.

But before we get on to "Anarchy in the UK", "God Save the Queen", and other such modern day clichés, I think it would only be appropriate to explore the song-writing and actual talent of the Sex Pistols.

While Steve Jones and Paul Cook represent the "hooligan" side of the band, the one who would pen most of their classic material was bassist Glenn Matlock. An actual musician, he had a clear idea of where to go and how well Jones could play. The sound itself owes a lot to mod rock (ala The Creation, The Who and The Action), Detroit proto-punk (namely, The Stooges and The Alice Cooper Band), and the New York Dolls. If you dissect the music from the vocals on their album and singles, you get some very catchy rock that no one else was playing in Britain as late as '75. Pub rock and prog ruled the day.

The lyrics themselves combined all of the most offensive material Johnny Rotten could get a hold of before hand. Peter Hammill's "Nadir's Big Chance" was an obvious and admitted influence (the title track could very well have been a Sex Pistols song), as well as Iggy Pop and Bowie. Also, The Kinks' political awareness and sing-along capacity were evident.

What is now standard song structure sounded at the time like white noise. The post-Beatles, post-"Tommy" era of pop was mature and all grown up. Non-musicians weren't supposed to try to play; rock n roll in general had largely been mutilated and forgotten. The bands to see were still ELP, Yes, and King Crimson. The fun music was being made in America, and even there, no one was listening.

Rick Wakemen put on a musical ice show based around Arthurian legend.

Never mind that this music was generally boring, mellow, and played to a crowd abusing downers, but it was also very safe. The white guys had made rock n roll theirs, and the white people who'd always been rock's main fan base ate it all up.

Of course a band like the Sex Pistols was going to be shocking. These were the musical standards people lived with. What is now nothing but a catchphrase for fashionable posture, the song "Anarchy in the U.K." was something unheard of. Not only did they play badly live, they also advocated mindless rebellion.

A lot of Americans, in turn, hated it. I believe this is based around the resentment that the Pistols didn't show off workmanship, play a tight set, etc., but I also think a lot of what they got was because of their status as "the real deal". Whereas Lou Reed (and the NY scene in general) were middle-class suburban rebels, Rotten actually lived in the poverty he sang of.

So, of course in a modern context, they will not be understood. Kids my age grow up with pop music that makes the Pistols look like the mastery musicians they despised. Not as many people listen to rock. In fact, rock in its real sense (no post-80's glam metal/Aerosmith/Led Zep crap) is one of the least listened to musics. People in general are clueless as to what rebellion is. The music industry wised up after so many punk-inspired flops in the late 70's. Instead of bands like the Ramones, the Clash, and the Sex Pistols challenging song structure and pop culture, we have Blink 182 indulging in copying crappy "melodic hardcore". We have "math metal", combining the most unlistenable of two worlds to create some truly useless atonal noise. We have the crust scene, that's duped itself into self-importance and self-righteousness. It's easy to ask "why didn't they go indie?", but at the time "going indie" was a process that would assuredly leave a band with nothing but a cult following. For any bands with aspirations of touring, it simply wasn't an option.

And sure, there's baggage that comes with being a Sex Pistols fan who lives in the middle class Great Plains of America (like all of the trendy kids who sport their shirts and whatnot), but if you're in it for the music, it shouldn't really matter. Johnny Rotten proved to have much musical integrity by forming the great PiL, who basically created the bass-heavy post-punk sound. You think a guy who ran a clothing store wrote those songs? Not likely.

So why are The Sex Pistols so important? Because they simply don't make music so urgent, vile, or catchy anymore. It's essential to listen to an recognize for anyone who wants to push the boundaries of pop farther without being pretentious dickheads.

 

 
People who liked this also liked:
Ramones - RamonesThe Clash - The ClashOperation Ivy - Operation IvyNOFX - Punk In DrublicThe Clash - London CallingDescendents - Milo Goes To CollegeMinor Threat - Complete DiscographyRancid - ... And Out Come The WolvesNOFX - The DeclineBad Brains - Bad Brains

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Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not respon sible for them in any way. Seriously.
wiffleball (October 9, 2010)

what can I say? maybe it was really commercial but the music in itself is really good, and it did help form the punk sound we know and love today

lovechuck (May 28, 2010)

fuckin great classic album a must have ....every cut is great love johnny rotten ,,,,,and fuck you if you dont like it faggotts

bayon (January 27, 2009)

bollox!

thomas7155 (October 3, 2007)

Wow. This record sucks.

Hey_Asshole (February 21, 2007)

fucking awful record. i would as soon listen to crass

Anonymous (February 5, 2007)

Could you have worse taste in music BSD?

tittytwisterbudy (December 24, 2006)

One of the most influential as well as overrated albums ever. It obviously was crucial to the development of punk and everything that developed becaues of punk, but that fact doesn't take away from how the record as a whole is good, not overwhelmoning great like everyone seems to think.

DenBez (August 21, 2006)

How can you breathe with all that bullshit caught in your throat?

clamum (July 17, 2006)

The reviewer tries to sound about twenty years older then he actually is. Your bitch ass needs to go douse yourself in gasoline and light yourself on fire. Please. You're such a know-it-all little fuck and it's pathetic.

Anonymous (June 4, 2006)

If the Ramones were the Beatles and The Clash were the Stones that would make the Sex Pistols the Monkees of punk.

clash_city_rocker (April 30, 2006)

blink-182 ain't punk, you sucker.

xGLEBExCOREx (March 23, 2006)

it's true, thouhg, the sex pistols are an amazing band even if they can get old after awhile, it's a fact that if they stayed relatively uknown like the saints than indie fags and fashin punks would revere them like they do black flag or somthin.

Anonymous (December 5, 2005)

xxxxxx

Bastardzach (August 13, 2005)

Good, but overrated.

Anonymous (December 1, 2004)

This website is truely becoming one of the worst sources for music reviews. Why not review new, creative projects instead of sticking with a 'safe bet'. You guys have about as much credibility for recognizing talent as Drive Thru Records.Really terrible.

Anonymous (December 1, 2004)

H Jay-Z is good. Linkin Park is shit. The two flavors dont mix at all.

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

I think you may be on the wrong site.

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

This score is for the Sex Pistols, and for dissing on Led Zeppelin and Yes, who are two of the most talented bands of the 70s.

Not-To-Regret (November 30, 2004)

"Pixies/Clash/Dwarves. The rest are embarrassing. Oh and for the love of christ - fuck fugazi"

How can you like the pixies clash and dwarves and not like any of the other bands I listed? they all stem from the same roots of rock and roll. You call Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin embarrasing? I call your comment embarrassing and revealing of your close-minded-ness (is that a real word?)

As for Fugazi... I say love em, like em, orhate emt. I can see why people don't like them... but minor threat wasn't any better in terms of the music itself.

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

Again good review, more people here should go to www.allmusic.com for reference when typing out reviews. Some of you punx cant get your facts straight.

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

I'm not sure why, but whenever I see a teenager walking down the street in the full Exploited/Punks-not-dead regalia, I just wanna drive by and scream "PUNX!!!" and then sing some Sham 69 song or something. Can anyone else relate?

--Cos

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

i sincerely hope that blink 182 comment was said in jest, or i may never sleep again..... and anyone that cares about jay z or linkin park, well, im just gonna sit in the corner and shiver for a while...
----Xis

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

Don't worry Boba, I'm confused as well.

boba_fett (November 30, 2004)

now im very confused...

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

Angel:

Fuck off you little bitch. Fuck the Sex Pistols too. I listen to emo stuff like Taking Back Sunday and punk like Blink 182, who I bet most of you have never heard of since you're too busy listening to your 1980s "fake punk" band. The only real punk band is Blink 182.
MissAliasOc

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

MissAliasOC- :hmm I was just wondering, and don't take this the wrong way but, Do you like any kind of music at all? I mean your opinion is yours alone, and you have the right to voice it, But it seems to me that your pretty much negitive about most music. So what do you listen to? Angel.

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

I've heard the album and apart from "Lying on You/Dirt off My Shoulder", I don't think it's anything great or special. If it were new songs, then I'd be more interested.

It's just another ploy for Jay Z to keep up his retirement bit and not release a full length new album, when we all know he wants to. But then again topping "The Black Album" would be difficult.

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

Hey I was just wondering what everybody thought about Jay-Z and Linkin park teaming up on this new album thats' called, Collision course that's out today! I saw their special on Mtv again this am, and again amazing! What do you guys think? Angel :-)

P.S. incase you haven heard anything about this yet, or you've been living under a rock or something! LOL! J/K! :P Just type in Linkin Park and there will be a link there for their official site. I would put it in the post, but I dunno if it's allowed. :unsure: Happy Surfing!

~*Angel~* :D

burntorangepeel (November 30, 2004)

(delete that "s" in "bands" in my post below)

Snoo!

burntorangepeel (November 30, 2004)

The Vandals are the most punk bands ever, and anyone who says otherwise is a poseur.

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

this stuff is essential..its better that this gets a review than the next emo schmuck everybody has forgotten in a year and a half

Anonymous (November 30, 2004)

dude you're about 27 years, 2 million swastickas and 1 dead heroine addict too late on this review

Anonymous (November 29, 2004)

Guy below me:

Hmmm, you don't capitalize any of your stuff, does that mean you're a midget?

-bemused

Anonymous (November 29, 2004)

"this band sucked. this album sucked. it still sucks. most overrated band of all time"

you sure do have an obsession with the word suck. as the wise men say, "you are what you write and also what you are in your private life as well as your public life such as work,school and social experiences from childhood to adolescence to young adulthood"

Anonymous (November 29, 2004)

I know. I totally hate it when bands know how to write songs and shit fuck that!

-BSD

soulbleed (November 29, 2004)

this band sucked. this album sucked. it still sucks. most overrated band of all time.

Anonymous (November 29, 2004)

Decent album but I could never get into it or any early english punk except the Damned.

Anonymous (November 29, 2004)

"That depends on what you call genuine rock n roll, I guess. I'd call it more "horribly contrived ....sort of.... roll"... make of that what you will.

I just find it slightly depressing when bands think it's all right to assault people with songs like "Shitting out the Can't Explain riff into a dull garage-rock song"... "

"Can't Explain" was never anything besides a garage rock riff... Have you heard the Who? The Stooges? Are they not rock n roll?

Say what you will about the Hives, but they are a genuine rock and roll band, if nothing else.

-BSD

Anonymous (November 29, 2004)

"Stone Temple Pilots - Tiny Music...
Pixies - Trompe Le Monde
Strung Out - Exile in Oblivion
The Clash - Sandinista
Green Day - American Idiot
The Lawerence Arms - Greatest Story Ever Told
Led Zeppelin - Physical Graffiti
Pink Floyd - The Wall
Paint It Black - CVA
Pearl Jam - No Code
Queens of The Stone Age - Rated R
The Dwarves - Dwarves must die
Deftones - White Pony
Fugazi - Repeater 3 Songs
Sublime - Robbin' The Hood "

Pixies/Clash/Dwarves. The rest are embarrassing. Oh and for the love of christ - fuck fugazi.

Anonymous (November 29, 2004)

The only credit I will give the Sex Pistols is that they basically created the Mall-Punk genre.

TheHead (November 29, 2004)

"Not everything has to make fucking waves. It's a bit much to ask a rock band to do anything besides rock out. At least they re-introduced genuine rock n roll to the mainstream.

-BSD"

That depends on what you call genuine rock n roll, I guess. I'd call it more "horribly contrived ....sort of.... roll"... make of that what you will.

I just find it slightly depressing when bands think it's all right to assault people with songs like "Shitting out the Can't Explain riff into a dull garage-rock song"... I mean... Walk Idiot Walk, or any of the other four chord wonders The Hives have graced us with. If all they want to do is rock out, they'd better get used to local pub gigs again, fast.

But that's enough of that.

Anonymous (November 29, 2004)

the sex pistols..

a corporate fabrication .... i.e. the backstreet boys of punk

Not-To-Regret (November 29, 2004)

Currently in my rotation:

Stone Temple Pilots - Tiny Music...
Pixies - Trompe Le Monde
Strung Out - Exile in Oblivion
The Clash - Sandinista
Green Day - American Idiot
The Lawerence Arms - Greatest Story Ever Told
Led Zeppelin - Physical Graffiti
Pink Floyd - The Wall
Paint It Black - CVA
Pearl Jam - No Code
Queens of The Stone Age - Rated R
The Dwarves - Dwarves must die
Deftones - White Pony
Fugazi - Repeater 3 Songs
Sublime - Robbin' The Hood

Now tell me that's not good tunes.

Anonymous (November 29, 2004)

You guys are waaaaaay too easy. Chinatown is obviously fucking with you guys. He may be a lonely and sad little troll for doing so but you guys need to take his Minor Threat bashing statements with a grain of salt.

-Little Italy

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

Ha, you fucks are still pissed about my comments... What I wrote there was flamebait. The same flamebait that you guys enjoy dishing out in reviews of good bands like Mock Orange, Ted Leo, and the like. Now we're even.

-Chinatown

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

So...where's the review of the actual album?

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

cant we like just listen to music? goddamn everyones fightin over whats this or whats shit...
its music remember? it goes in your ears.
sex pistols r pretty cool tho. and minor threat. and bad religion.

lushj (November 28, 2004)

The hair on the back of my neck still stands up when I hear the marching boots of "Holiday in the Sun". Song by song, this is an all-time classic. They pillaged the glam and rock underground (MC5, NY Dolls, Slade), got inspired by both The Ramones and The NY Dolls, and came out with this. The cultural upheaval they encouraged didn't hurt them either, which is what most of the comments below seem to be about.

I'm stoked that they only put out one album- could you imagine what dreck they would've sunk to with no Matlock and only Rotten able to string listenable tunes together? Of course, Sid's "My Way" is pretty entertaining, but that doesn't make it rise to the level of this record.

P.S.- The whole "hardcore this and hardcore that" argument is lacking in context. When Minor Threat and Black Flag and MIA and DOA and NOTA were around, thru the late 80s, there was only one hardcore. In the late 80s NYHC (that was denoted by "straight edge hardcore" or "NYHC") came out, but it wasn't a completely separate scene or music. Emo bands (you know, real ones like Heroin, Struggle, End of the Line, Moss Icon) started using hardcore to describe their music scene, as did the muscleheads. At this point, both "hardcore" and "emo" have become so removed from their first few uses that they're unusable- unless you like having conversations like "what kind of hardcore? The Freeze? Youth of Today? Biohazard? Poison the Well? Heroin?"

jamespastepunk (November 28, 2004)

I'm not a Pistols fan, but I'd have to be certifiably dead to call this record anything but classic.

Remember guys, they'll only rip punk rock apart if we fight this much. Our scene needs more unity.

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

PS thats from me, Xis

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

BSD and Soybomb are now my dear friends. Chinatown, my hated enemy....Get in yur shit-talk-mobile, drive on down here to DC and we'll talk about just how non-influential Minor Threat was...
and btw, dont make that kind of comparison between mt and fugazi. they were 2 completely different bands at different times who existed for different reasons. try "LISTENING" to the music, instead of just hearing it.

Big_Guy (November 28, 2004)

For how much of a dick BSD is, he sure knows how to write an interesting review.

joeg (November 28, 2004)

I have no problem with admitting liking Yes' "Owner of a Lonely Heart" The video for that song was the bomb. Dude jumps off a building and turns into a hawk? Classic.

Jesse (November 28, 2004)

You say that like Yes is a bad thing. God knows we all air guitar the whole 90125 album.

boba_fett (November 28, 2004)

Hardcore, like punk, is dead.

-BSD

ill just refer you to the FAQs:

# 1.01 Isn't punk dead?

Well if it is, we're all zombies and you've stumbled upon our secret lair. Grr. Argh. and so forth.

SOYBOMB (November 28, 2004)

"It's a bit much to ask a rock band to do anything besides rock out."

That's the first comment you've ever made that I actually agree with you on.

Peace,
-SOYBOMB-

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

"Neither band contributes anything to music, and don't appear to even be bothered to try. What's most depressing about The Hives is that they appear to be quite intelligent, yet they still continue to tread the well worn path of the rock revival. At least Simple Plan have the defense of being incredibly stupid, and not knowing any better."

They're contributing well written rock songs?

Not everything has to make fucking waves. It's a bit much to ask a rock band to do anything besides rock out. At least they re-introduced genuine rock n roll to the mainstream.

-BSD

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

boy bands suck, whether theyre wearing punk rock bondage gear or the latest fashions

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

BAD RELIGION rulez

-Chinatown

TheHead (November 28, 2004)

"Well, for one,

they are completely different types of bands with totally different songs. If you can't tell a Hives song apart from a SP song, maybe you need to get your hearing checked.

-BSD"

Well, obviously there are very few similarities between the bands sonically. The similarities lie more in their attitude to the music they make i guess - both bands are equally pointless in that... oh yeah.... it's been done a million times before.

Neither band contributes anything to music, and don't appear to even be bothered to try. What's most depressing about The Hives is that they appear to be quite intelligent, yet they still continue to tread the well worn path of the rock revival. At least Simple Plan have the defense of being incredibly stupid, and not knowing any better.

Crookedsuperhero (November 28, 2004)

Chinatown, why do you put yourself into these stupid arguements you can never win?

joeg (November 28, 2004)

"Minor Threat is hardly what I would call hardcore. Ian sings a lot more than he screams, and the music, albeit fast, is way too soft to fit under that genre"

that without a doubt proves Chinatown is a troll and a fucking bad one at that.

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

"That's a ridiculous argument. Just because I don't think Minor Threat fits particularly well under the hardcore genre (especially their later songs; tracks 14-26 in "Discography) I am misled?"

Yes, you are. Some things are just facts... Say what you want about how "overrated" they are, but you need to pull your head out of your ass and at least recognize them for what they were.

Unless you happen to be really ignorant...

Or happen to be posting things on a messageboard to "get a rise" out of people... While I'll admit that is sometimes funny, waking up in the morning and deciding to go shit talk on a message board is kind of warped and more sad than it is trully offensive.

Thank you for kindly removing yourself from my review, and to anyone else here, I suggest not to let him annoy you with his flamebait... While his ignorance/cynicality may be angering, the deep self-hate it takes to actually waste your life systematically posting on every single subject of a site you don't care about quite outweighs that.

-BSD

SansX (November 28, 2004)

the sex pistols were a boy band put together by a future hiphop DJ. Mind you, I enjoy some of the SP stuff (as well as mr mclaren's), but its not really, well, art. its the aural equivelant of pornography or b horror movies. Image, texture, but no substance. Being the first to be popular AND obscene doesn't make it any less sophomoric. Fv

SOYBOMB (November 28, 2004)

This score is for The Hives, who without a doubt put on the best live show one could ever possibly see, not to mention they're plain great to listen to.

Tyrannosaurus Hives was the best disc of 2004.

Peace,
-SOYBOMB-

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

Go away, Chinatown.

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

"Their sound is hardly influential. "

I meant to write "experimental."

-Chinatown

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

anyone who ever says an unkind word about minor threat has been GROSSLY misled about all things related to music, art, poetry, creativity, BREATHING...
---Xis

That's a ridiculous argument. Just because I don't think Minor Threat fits particularly well under the hardcore genre (especially their later songs; tracks 14-26 in "Discography) I am misled? What if I say Fugazi > Minor Threat? Am I still misled?

Minor Threat, although very influential, were not there to redefine anything. Their sound is hardly influential. Plus, Ian's lyrics were pretty bland on the surface--the Hemingway of punk. Sure, they meant lots, but that doesn't change the fact that they're boring to read.

(This score is still for the Sex Pistols. Minor Threat gets about a 7 or an 8.)

-Chinatown

(Pavement, Fugazi and Jets to Brazil get 11s.)

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

what's even more overrated is your performance on me last night OH!

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

thanks for the history lesson. now how about a review of the record and not the band.

This album is good but vastly over-rated.

Anonymous (November 28, 2004)

Ok normally i disagree with BSD, but this time im handin it to ya. great review. ALTHOUGH i will point out to all you arguing over who created the pistols fashions, who wrote their songs, etc, go read lydons autobiography "rotten" and it should all be very clear. anyway the fashion argument really needs to end...i dont care what bands you like but quit rippin people for what they wear. that is easily the most senseless ongoing argument on this site. just because more than one person on earth are wearing the same thing doesnt make it a trend or even a fashion for that matter.....and oh yeah one more thing..chinatown FUCK OFF!! you are the dumbest fucker on here easily. anyone who ever says an unkind word about minor threat has been GROSSLY misled about all things related to music, art, poetry, creativity, BREATHING...
---Xis

The_Wang (November 27, 2004)

also, Led Zeppelin were on an indie label, Swan Song, in '74.

The_Wang (November 27, 2004)

"In fact, rock in its real sense (no post-80's glam metal/Aerosmith/Led Zep crap)"

Zepplein actually formed in '68 and broke up in september '80. So they don't really count as "post-80's glam metal". They are more blues based stadium rock anywho.

Pistols rock, who cares if they don't fit the narrow punk straight jacket cast upon them by small minded fools. If you don't like the music, don't listen. If you don't like them because of poser's who do, you are a fuckwad, and as much of a poser as those you despise.

Peace out
-the wang

-Strewtho- (November 27, 2004)

Great album, the only song I'd consider skipping is Submission. It's hard to go past Bodies though, best song on the album.

Also, are those avril lavinge comments real? I hope not.

-Strewtho.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Was that comment?

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

was this review really needed?... i mean really come on.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"Aside from the Thermals, I can't think of any good garage rock revival bands.

-Chinatown"
Chinatown, you really need to look beyond MTV2 and Alternative Press. I hate the term "Garage Rock, as it means about as much as "Alternative".....but I know what you're saying when you use it, so I guess the utility of "Garage rock" has done it's job. Anyway, I don't know who the Thermals are, but you could call The Dirtbombs, The Ponys, Reigning Sound, Compulsive Gamblers, River City Tanlines, Real Losers, Guitar Wolf, The Gories, The Mummies, The Oblivions, The Reatards, the Sights, The Hentchmen, Human Eye, Easy Action, Boxcar Satan, Immortal Lee County Killers, The mistreaters, Clone Defects, The Hutches, Hot Machines, Miss Alex White, MOTO, Teengenerate, Bob Log, Ect........"Garage Revival", and they are all pretty good-to-awsome, and quite a few of them are pushing the boundaries of rocknroll, while paying homage to the past.....and I guarentee they are all better than anything MTV and AP will let you listen too.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"Minor Threat is hardly what I would call hardcore. Ian sings a lot more than he screams, and the music, albeit fast, is way too soft to fit under that genre."

This post has me 100% convinced that chinatown is a fake poster.

-American Idle

gladimnotemo (November 27, 2004)

"Quite the opposite. I believe that by listening to the GOOD punk, the GOOD hardcore, and everything else, we can hope to create something new and more relevant."

I think what happens though, is that people start with the 'classics', then go down the wrong road and start to create the terrible music we have today...Look at the reviews on the side bar...they could count 'punk' somewhere in their influences, but most of the music is pop; it's not dangerous, or relevant in any way...

I say everyone here that gets it should go start a band right now...right?

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Really, Chinatown, your comments may as well just say "I'm really ignorant".

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Aside from the Thermals, I can't think of any good garage rock revival bands.

-Chinatown

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Well, for one,

they are completely different types of bands with totally different songs. If you can't tell a Hives song apart from a SP song, maybe you need to get your hearing checked.

-BSD

TheHead (November 27, 2004)

"Who were the last good band to get popular? The Hives? And people don't even care about them anymore..."

You know, there's probably a good reason for that. The words "Flogging" "dead" and "horse" come to mind.

I've always thought that the Sex Pistols were rubbish anyway, but at least they were rubbish first. Beyond the outfits, what have The Hives really got to offer tha much maligned (and deservedly so)t bands like Simple Plan haven't?

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

your all f**king morons. I

ElVaquero (November 27, 2004)

My conclusion from all of this is that the latest Leatherface record really should've moved a few thousand more units.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Who were the last good band to get popular? The Hives? And people don't even care about them anymore...

-BSD

Not-To-Regret (November 27, 2004)

Mainstream music will always be worse than underground. Mainstream fuels creativity in the underground. As for music now... I could only pray that we see a re-emergence of good music in the mainstream (ie: 1990's grunge, 70's rock).

I'll always choose the lesser of two evils.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Gray-

I'm not nostalgic for what I don't know. As someone born after all of the important hardcore bands had disbanded, I don't care about "reclaiming" hardcore for the real hardcore bands...

Hardcore, like punk, is dead. The fakes and jocks and whoever you want to drag into it killed the genre.

I'm not advocating "old school". Quite the opposite. I believe that by listening to the GOOD punk, the GOOD hardcore, and everything else, we can hope to create something new and more relevant.

It's just my belief that right now, the underground is more cluttered than the mainstream when it comes to making music.

-BSD

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

the hardcore of today such as the hatebreed type bands is a complete and total joke. its turned into a fucking equation, dare i say it, almost like pop punk bands. you plug in a few variables with a metallic growl and a breakdown for idiots to start punching the air and tell the kids "I WILL BE HEARD" and call it hardcore. its turned into as much a fashion as the street punk genre that gets bastardized frequently on this site. ironic ain't it? then they continue to call themselves DIY and underground while whoring themselves on mtv and going on tours sponsored by mtv......OH I'm sorry, mtv2, totally different. i never knew hardcore was all about being thugs and channeling the testosterone out every single pore in your body. if anything, hardcore died in the 80's BECAUSE of all the thuggery and violence that you see in today's hardcore secne. these self proclaimed hardocre for life bands need to just call themselves metal bands for god sakes and be done with it.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

***Thanksgiving Message from California Governor Gray Davis***

Wow, what a sordid commentary on the punk scene this dude lays upon us--

Punk music rendering its own obsolesence, that's something really sad. Oh, I've never heard that one before. Let's mourn the obsolescene. Boo, fucking hoo.

Oh, wait, but a lot of great movements that accomplish what they set out to do render their own obsolescene. Those that waged some of the classic social battles of the day--against American slavery, women's suffrage or even Prohibition--are they still around? Well, they're dead probably now, but after they accomplished their deeds, they probably wouldn't have formed shitty special interest groups, 501(c)(3)'s, and generally whored themselves to the political parties. They'd just pack up and go home.

The most totally real and genuine of social advocates, from the environment to gun rights, toil for the day when they can finish what they started and just go home.

If the punk rock of today does not reflect the urgency, the social apprehension and the danger of the punk rock of yesterday, i.e. if "punk rock is dead," and if there are so many pale, crappy imitators, more commerical interests to make the artform more economically viable and shitloads more punk poseurs "Avril Lavigne," and if even uttering the words "Anarchy in the U.K." make even Mormons laugh, then my question is "SO FUCKING WHAT?"

Can't that not be interpreted as a sign of accomplishment and success? That the punk ethos--however bastardized it maybe--has become a new fascination in the American mainstream, even though the artform itself is not. Furthermore, punk music is now more commercially viable, the scenes flourishing together more nationally (instead of the regional crap back in the 80's), that we drove the Nazi skins mostly out of the music, and so many ancillary punk-related industries have sprung up on the side (i.e. www.cinderblock.com)? The music is more accesible, viable, and a little more financially stable today. Is this somehow not success?

As for the actual notes and rhythms itself--I'm not a musicology major, but I know that mourning for more Black Flag and Minor Threat-inspired music would be a stupid and futile exercise. Here's something shocking for the world: Music evolves. It doesn't stay stagnant and static forever. And punk music evolves in its own way--it gets bastardized and it gets balkanized. Punks choose stupid little labels (Oooo, I'm anarchal-political, I'm straight edge, I'm crust-core) and go their stupid little ways and they shit on each other's little ticker-tape parade when they confront themselves with the distinctions. Bastardize and balkanize, mutilate, deform and slander. They cry: why can't we go back to Black Flag and Minor Threat? But I cry: why can't we retrace our steps from the Big Bang while we're at it?!

I might be pissed that the punk hey days of the 1980's are gone, even more pissed that three of the Ramones are also gone, but its just stupid to just wish for those days over and over again.

I believe that the punk scene of today was not some tragic mistake or a byproduct from the punk rock of yesterday--that some of it was a logical, foreseeable consequence. I believe that poseurs and punk fashion are the stereotypes we must endure to keep the punk music of today. I also believe that punk music has also progressed and achieved so much for punkers and countless others, that it would be sheer folly to consider it a failed artform.

The punk music of yesterday became obsolete because the punk music of today is slightly more successful and viable.

And really who gives a shit about the poseurs--maybe in five years, Avril Lavigne will trade her worn-down punk duds for an emo-tight fitting T-shirt and shiny-shiny shoes, chasing Jim Adkins from Jimmy Eat World. Who will care to think about the irony?

"I'm Gray Davis, and I approved this message."

Gray Davis

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

It seems to me like hardcore evolved into totally separate species (like man and apes). On one hand you have "punk hardcore" represented by bands like Kid Dynamite and, on the other hand, you have "metal hardcore" played by Shadows Fall, Hatebreed, and their ilk.

Though the two sounds have followed different paths, I have a hard time believing that one is more or less hardcore or meaningful than the other. I would also point out that the success metal hardcore has had recently shouldn't be held against the entire genre or scene... I mean, the punk scene was overrun by fashionistas after Blink-182 got big, but that didn't mean the scene was dead or meaningless.

Pacer (November 27, 2004)

"Minor threat aren't hardcore." Way to show yourself up there buddy.

TheFeesh (November 27, 2004)

I think more of the danger in hardcore or punk bands nowadays is in the lyrics. Good review by the way.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"Minor Threat is hardly what I would call hardcore. Ian sings a lot more than he screams, and the music, albeit fast, is way too soft to fit under that genre.

-Chinatown"

crickets chirp in the background..........................

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Thanks for your input, Chinatown. I'm sorry, I guess I just don't know anything about the genre.

I'm a "newb".

Please enlighten me on what "real" hardcore is...

-BSD

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Minor Threat is hardly what I would call hardcore. Ian sings a lot more than he screams, and the music, albeit fast, is way too soft to fit under that genre.

-Chinatown

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"Your point about New York being jealous/resentful of the Pistols--NY wasn't interested in social revolution, they were interested in art. All of the bands in NY--the Dolls, Heartbreakers, Ramones, Dead Boys, Blondie--were toying with ideas of pop music. London/English bands--Pistols their circle, the Clash--were trying to create a sensation with outrageous behavior and outlandish political ideas. The Ramones and their circle HATED them for that; they stole their thunder and made punk a trend instead of a lasting musical idea (That said, the Ramones loved playing in England because they were so popular)."

I used to think that, but if you listen to the music, the Clash, the Pistols, and the Damned aren't that different from their NY counterparts (of course, the Dolls were bigger in Europe than they were in the US)... You can't blame the Pistols for creating a look that caught on. I can only assume that in 1975, no one thought that looking like a poor person would catch on. The same thing with bondage gear and leather.

-BSD

boba_fett (November 27, 2004)

gotta agree with that article below me, written by BSD i assume.

those new bands like atreyu and whoeverr else in that genre arent what id call hardcore... its post hardcore. the classic sounding hardcore still exists in the punk/hardcore genre today. at least thats how i see it anyway.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"They didn't care about their music or pushing boundaries as musicians, they cared about looking the part and making money off of that look."

You have no clue what you are talking about it. Try to come up with a more cliche criticism of a great, influential band. Malcom McLaren was in it for the money, the band was in it for the music. The Sex Pistols popularized the look, but they didnt go to extremes to push the look. The style was secondary to the music and to the antagonizing of everything/one normal.

Cos (November 27, 2004)

I'll agree that this album is very important, but with some reservations. One: The Ramones did this sound earlier, they did it faster, and Joey Ramone is far more listenable than Johnny Rotten. Two: The Ramones wrote a whole album full of good stuff--the Pistols had some questionable filler on "Bollucks".

Your point about New York being jealous/resentful of the Pistols--NY wasn't interested in social revolution, they were interested in art. All of the bands in NY--the Dolls, Heartbreakers, Ramones, Dead Boys, Blondie--were toying with ideas of pop music. London/English bands--Pistols their circle, the Clash--were trying to create a sensation with outrageous behavior and outlandish political ideas. The Ramones and their circle HATED them for that; they stole their thunder and made punk a trend instead of a lasting musical idea (That said, the Ramones loved playing in England because they were so popular). I don't think there was any sort of class resentment at all. Did anybody in the Pistols sell their ass on the street?

--Cos

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

I could only find the rough, but it's better than nothing

"And Be Counted?"

A ripped, twenty-something white guy with a baseball cap he can't put on properly and a dark blue hoodie growls something incomprehensible into the mic. Behind him, a likewise uniformed band plods through a mid-tempo nu-metal riff Slipknot would have otherwise enjoyed using. The vocalist's insecurity climaxes with a scream that truly fits his underdeveloped hormones and a circular kick that floors me with his grosse amounts of fighting prowess.

Why so violent, fauxcore kid? Did your imaginary friend "stab you in the back" and "leave you for dead"? Do you feel justified in perpetrating an idiotic, most regressive way of thinking for the sake of selling units?

The majority of your young, angry white boy contingency do, too.

Following suit after the popularization of fake punk bands, the new, mainstreamed hardcore of bands like Throwdown, Hatebreed, and All Out War is taking America by storm. It may seem like a natural step to the naive, but for over twenty years, hardcore remained the most adamantly anti-MTV, anti-showbiz sect of all of the genres to spring from the late 70's punk scene.

So what is "hardcore", anyway? While many have their different opinions, anyone with depth in underground music will generally agree that it started as a genre with bands like Black Flag (formed in 77, and put out the crucial independent release "Nervous Breakdown" the next year, launching the now-famous SST records) in LA, Bad Brains in DC (went from playing jazz fusion to sounding like a Clash record played at 45 RPM), Discharge in the UK (came together in 1977, but didn't speed it up until 79, creating a blueprint for the genres of thrash, crossover, crust-punk, and grind), and their influences, Crass (one of the few bands to actually put their anarchist beliefs into effect, and released "The Feeding of the 5000" in '78, which contained songs that were unbelievably fast and noisy for their time period). Following them would be other important bands, like Minor Threat, SSD, Negative Approach, Circle Jerks, Infest, DRI, LARM, Conflict, Nausea, MDC, the Neos, and countless others.

These were bands that based their sound around speed rather than melody or heaviness (though there were some exceptions), and the lyrics about what was on their minds. While the original punk scene preferred to distance themselves from hardcore because of the violence associated with the concerts and the youth of most of the fans, hardcore stole its attitude from it and took it to it's natural extremes.

Over the years, the bands grew up and started catering to their own tastes. Black Flag started playing long, drawn out blues-metal songs. The Bad Brains started playing reggae exclusively, instead of the two or three song limit they had before. Discharge disolved and started pandering to the crowd whose music was influenced by theirs, but not as good. Crass suicided in '84, as planned, and by then were making arty, more musical albums. Minor Threat broke up and Ian McKaye formed the famous Fugazi, who set the standard as far as mellow, PC indie rock goes.

There were still bands going along, though, most noticeably in the East Coast, where the music seemed to be slowing down in favor crossover (thrash metal meets hardcore). The attitude and urgency slowly changed from "I'm dissatisfied with this/let's take speed to new levels" to "my friend stabbed me in the back/let's have a brutal breakdown". The crowds in attendance were increasingly more uniformed and violent.
Hardcore was no longer music for the persecuted individuals (who were by now minimal due to the public acceptance of punks), it was for the jocks, but it still was not making all too much money.

Enter hardcore in the new age...

A marketing gimmick for the kids who ate up Limp Bizkit, KoRn, Slipknot, and Trapt while it was cool. Angry white boys on MTV/FUSE who don't put on makeup or look too "goth" are really cool to people who want to fit in. Cool like Timothy McVeigh and the Unabomber... They also cash-in on the fact that this "hardcore" seems to still be a counterculture, and is therefore very easy to make a fashion trend to the kids who jump on the various stereotypical images "dangerous" music always seems to produce.

So what does "hardcore" stand for now? "Killing two birds with one stone" say the music industry slime balls, who at one time believed in something.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

hey BSD, can you please post your hardcore article somewhere on the internet then?? cause i would really love reading it

joeg (November 27, 2004)

"I wrote an article for my zine on the evolution of hardcore"

I'd like to have a read of that.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"does that an authentic Sex Pistols fan make?"

I'm guessing this is because I didn't take a "personal" tone...

Most reviews of old albums are usually nostalgic, and that's okay for some, but I'm only 16. Young people nostalgia is pretty trite.

-BSD

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"do we have any dangerous bands anymore?"

Most bands people consider "dangerous" are too underground to be a threat to mainstream society... Will there ever be another Black Flag? It depends how many people stop trying to just directly copy old bands and try to integrate their own sound into things. Black Flag could have been anything... They formed before hardcore... They just happened to have been playing it for years when the hardcore movement actually started up around 1980... The next Black Flag would be a band who played their own type of music, but did it in a chaotic manner.

The problem with most new "old school" hardcore is how forced it sounds. The speed doesn't sound very genuine, and the music's not original. So these bands that copy Black Flag and Minor Threat have nothing in common with them, because BF and MT were doing stuff that was actually very original. I wrote an article for my zine on the evolution of hardcore.

-BSD

adam (November 27, 2004)

"As much as I love the Ramones I wouldn´t say that they have/had a challenging song structure."

You misread. BSD wasn't saying that the Ramones had a challenging song structure, he was saying that they were challenging notions of what song structure should be given the pop culture of their day.

-adam

inanechild (November 27, 2004)

Despite what the kids say, I've always really enjoyed this album. As for BSD, I can't figure out why people slag him - he's one of the few intelligent sounding people on this website and I generally agree with him (except for when he said psychobilly was just a gimmick genre, but I'll let that slide.)

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

'' the sex pistols and the clash are fucking clown shoes.''

I second that, score is for making my laugh on Saturday morning.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

" Instead of bands like the Ramones, the Clash, and the Sex Pistols challenging song structure and pop culture,"

As much as I love the Ramones I wouldn´t say that they have/had a challenging song structure.

gladimnotemo (November 27, 2004)

So if the Pistols are important for being dangerous on all levels, have there been any other bands since them that have had the same effect? The Black Flag-led scene caused riots in LA, and I think GG Allin was a later incarnation of their spirit....but other than that, do we have any dangerous bands anymore?

adam (November 27, 2004)

"Adam, I think you missed my point, but I appreciate your efforts to keep me honest.... "

Thanks for the well thought out reply, I knew you weren't just some ass trying to get attention.

Your argument on the context of the Pistols is a sound one and I think quite applicable to a lot of people. I don't doubt that somewhere out there there's people with less than authentic tastes, but in my experience I've seen way way more people who attack the Pistols, not as a means of expressing their own tastes, but because it's the hip and trendy thing to do in the new-school. So it probably goes both ways. This is a band that made such huge cultural waves that you're going to get idiots coming out on all sides.

But do I question BSD's authenticity here? No. This is in line with a lot of classic punk he's reviewed and said he liked. Even if most of his facts are "research based" and not "experience based" he plainly states what social/material context he grew up in so it's not like he's pretending to be a first-hand witness.

"and for all the people out there who really, honestly, LIKE the Pistol's music... uh... that's... uh... cool."

Had to choke that one out eh? We are out there my friend. I'm quite partial to throwing on this record and running around the house singing and shouting like an maniac.

-adam

ThreeChordsAndTheTruth (November 27, 2004)

More about the music itself would have pleased me, but then, if you're on this site, chances are you don't need to be told how they sound. BSD, you should write more reviews.

In other news, John(ny) Lydon (Rotten) is now doing a nature show on tv in the UK about insects.

xmidipunkbastardx (November 27, 2004)

a damn great review indeed.

still, the music on its own doesn't do a single fucking thing for me.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

www.nabisco.com

colin (November 27, 2004)

wow. i must say, this is one of the best reviews i've read in a long time on this site. the knowledge presented drives the more opinion based part of it right into yer skull. props to bsd for a well structured arguement.

agree 100% that there is no music that is nearly as dangerous today. i think a lot of bands would like to be considered dangerous - and, at the same time, pensive, intelligent, yet depressive and other things affiliated with myspace.com.

i'm not exactly sure if there ever will be a band able to be as dangerous as the sex pistols - in this day and age with the widespread media and the taboos of society quickly disappearing with every broadcast on fox, the innocense of the world is basically lost on the screen and there won't be much left to shock in a few years. so here's to bullocks while we still remember what all our favorite bands are based in.

(sorry for any incoherencies, i'm very tired and its 4:15am)

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"I've read lots of nice, literate comments from this IP in the past but that was just a dreadfully ignorant and self-absorbed comment."

Adam, I think you missed my point, but I appreciate your efforts to keep me honest....

My comment wasn't calling all Pistols fans posers... it was saying that there are a lot of people who spend a lot of time saying how great and revolutionary they were who don't appreciate the band because of their music. ( If you do, that's great.)

Why is this significant?

In my opinion, the Sex Pistols weren't the most musically compelling band (something Mr. Rotten has often trumpeted). That makes me suspicious of people who claim to be Pistols fans because, unless they were alive and listening to music in the 70's (when rock was pretty stale), it'd be hard for them to appreciate the vast contextual merits of the band... and that context was a huge part of the Sex Pistols' success.

We all know that taste is a personal matter, and for all the people out there who really, honestly, LIKE the Pistol's music... uh... that's... uh... cool... none of this applies to you. But in my experience there are many, many people out there whose interest is significantly less authentic. And that annoys me.

The real question is, what about BSD? He's obviously done his homework and he's written a very literate review. But does that an authentic Sex Pistols fan make? On that, you'll have to draw your own conclusions....

bemused (November 27, 2004)

Good review. I don't agree with the people giving DEP shit. I think they truly are/have pushed the boundaries of hard rock and metal.

As for this record, I love the singles off this album. Pity Sid Vicious destroyed this band, and Matlock never really got the attention he deserved

-Chris-

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"I created Punk for this day and age. Do you see Britney walking around wearing ties and singing punk? Hell no. That's what I do. I'm like a Sid Vicious for a new generation."
Avril Lavigne (Seventeen Magazine, 2002)

"People are like, 'Well, she doesn't know the Sex Pistols.' Why would I know that stuff? Look how young I am. That stuff's old, right?"
Avril Lavigne (Entertainment Weekly, 2002)

"I created Punk for this day and age. Do you see Britney walking around wearing ties and singing punk? Hell no. That's what I do. I'm like a Sid Vicious for a new generation."
Avril Lavigne (Seventeen Magazine, 2002)

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"Why would anyone want to listen to music that isn't technical or proficient?

It's like picking James Patterson over Evelyn Waugh. Absolutely ridiculous.

-Chinatown"

Hahahahahahahaha.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Why would anyone want to listen to music that isn't technical or proficient?

It's like picking James Patterson over Evelyn Waugh. Absolutely ridiculous.

-Chinatown

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

"I'm sorry but I just don't get the Sex Pistols' popularity. They represent the style over substance aspect of music that I absolutely abhor. They didn't care about their music or pushing boundaries as musicians, they cared about looking the part and making money off of that look. In my opinion, they are no different from the Casualties. The only difference between the two bands is that the Sex Pistols have sucked for longer than the Casualties"

You can dislike the Sex Pistols for musical reasons. I have no problem with that. But the classic Pistols bashing argument that they dressed the way they did just to make money and that they didn't push musical boundaries is ludicrous and simply incorrect. Who the fuck was doing what the Pistols were doing back then? You don't even realize how crooked your argument is. You hate bands that don't make an effort to push boundaries? How many bands do you listen to today are unique and different and genre bending? Correct me if I'm wrong people but wasn't punk rock about just getting up on stage and start playing without having to worry about how technical and how proficient it sounded? You played by your own rules, not by some obligation to please music critics. Nobody consicously thinks "Ok, I need to be totally different so people will notice me." That's a crock of bullshit. Nobody aspires to be boundary pushers, it comes naturally. You either have it or don't have it. So your argument that the Pistols didn't push enough boundaires as musicians just doesn't hold water. The Pistols were doing their sound first which was subsequently ripped off by all the bands you listen to today. I think that point is lost on too many kids today who worship bands like the Bouncing Souls and Dropkick Murphys and Green Day but then have the balls to slam the Sex Pistols (and just recently Minor Threat) because they sound too "simple" or not different enough. Fuck without these bands many bands today would not be around. Punk rock is fucking rock n roll stripped to its roots and if their simplicity is a fucking crime in your eyes, then go listen to Yanni and Dillinger Escape Plan and be impressed.

As for the argument about the fashion, going by your statment, many punk bands that were sprouting up at the time in England, including the Ramones and the Clash, who had the "punk" look were in it to make money. That argument is just flawed. The fashion at the time, contrary to what you may believe, was actually how these people looked in their everyday life! Incredible, I know! I don't know how much money was made by dressing like that but you could be damn sure you were going to get your ass kicked walking around like that. Today, you've got Hot topic and kids in mohwaks at the Warped Tour being picked up by mommy. Different times, different consequenes.

I say anybody who uses this argument was still 5 years from being a zygote when the Pistols released this album and talking out of their ass. Period.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Um no, he didn't explain. He made comparisons to the Ramones, but what do they sound like? Are they influenced by the Archers of Loaf?

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

It's all in the review, you dumbass

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Yeah, but what does it sound like? Kind of pointless to write down the entire history of the band without mentioning what their music was like.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Sid Vicious was lip-syncher.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Does it bother you then how the Clash formed? Or even DK?

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

The thing that bothers me about this band is how they formed and stuff.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

BRAVO! My first love..........I remember the day in 7th grade when I first got this. It didn't leave my cd player for a month or so. This album will always be in my top 5.
~Petro B. Pettson

Fuzzy (November 27, 2004)

I love this album, and you make some good points in the review, but I do think it's cute that you're going to one day grow up to review for Pitchfork.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

the sex pistols and the clash are fucking clown shoes. the ramones are the only punk band there ever was or ever will be. the end.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Chinatown-

You are one of the most outspoken, tasteless assholes on this site. Please don't turn my review into an argument, and to people reading this; I swear, he's just a little ignorant English kid who wants your attention.

-BSD

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

So's the one for "London Calling." I mean, the guy gave it a 10, when it actually only deserves about a 2.

-Chinatown

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

I'd also like to point out that at this point, some people clearly lost my point. Oh well. I figured that a 16 year old should be easy to follow...

I'd also like to admit that this review was done purely due to the fact that this site's other "Bollocks" review seemed kind of shabby to me.

-BSD

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

I hate this record. Not because it was put out by a major, not because of the band's commerical intentions, just because the songwriting and lyrics suck ass.

-Chinatown

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Thanks for all the compliments... Since my review IS the argument, I won't really bother here...

-BSD

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

I'm sorry but I just don't get the Sex Pistols' popularity. They represent the style over substance aspect of music that I absolutely abhor. They didn't care about their music or pushing boundaries as musicians, they cared about looking the part and making money off of that look. In my opinion, they are no different from the Casualties. The only difference between the two bands is that the Sex Pistols have sucked for longer than the Casualties.

Also, this review reads like a Pitchfork review, in that it is just a rambling piece in which you talk more about the state of music than the content of this album.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

Finally! A relevant review on time for the album's release.
Wait.
No.

Anchors (November 27, 2004)

I abhor this band.

adam (November 27, 2004)

Not that I feel like having everything degrade into an argument here, but to the person who said: "I've always thought that most people claim to like the Sex Pistols for the same reason they claim to like the Beatles: because they read somewhere that they were influential, and not because they actually listen to the record a lot, identified with the lyrics, and were able to rock out to it"

You've been going through life with a pretty warped opinion of the way the world works. I know plenty of people who enjoy both the Beatles and/or the Sex Pistols who haven't stepped foot in a "music scene" in their entire lives. These aren't kids on the internet trying to look intelligent, these are people who genuinely connect with the music and enjoy it on their own level. Just because you personally can't "rock out to" Never Mind The Bollocks or Revolver or whatever else, doesn't mean that those of us who claim to are somehow pretending.

I've read lots of nice, literate comments from this IP in the past but that was just a dreadfully ignorant and self-absorbed comment. You're entitled to your own opinion but the rest of us will pass on using it as a barometer of what we're allowed to like.

-adam

joeg (November 27, 2004)

"whether or not you agree with the pistols' status within the scene, you have to give BSD for writing one the most well developed reviews on this site. thanks for finally giving people on this site something worth reading"

Yep. I'm just glad this site finally got a proper Pistols review. The one that was already here was total crap.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

whether or not you agree with the pistols' status within the scene, you have to give BSD for writing one the most well developed reviews on this site. thanks for finally giving people on this site something worth reading.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

More relevant for their ability to annoy than their ability to rock.

I've always thought that most people claim to like the Sex Pistols for the same reason they claim to like the Beatles: because they read somewhere that they were influential, and not because they actually listen to the record a lot, identified with the lyrics, and were able to rock out to it. As BSD is the poster child for mad poserism on this site, I suspect that's probably the case here... even if he doesn't admit it.

That argument has about as much merit as avril lavigne's insight into punk rock. Its based on complete ignorance and conjecture. But then again, I'd expect that from people on this site who were still wetting their beds while the pistols were playing and influencing many bands you listen to today. Your argument boils down to judging pistols fans as poseurs (the very same lame argument you levy against BSD). Good job. You can hate on the pistols and idiotically claim they had no importance or influence or musical ability whatsover all you want. But come up with something better than "I can't rock out to them" and "Pistols fans are poseurs."

gladimnotemo (November 27, 2004)

"Instead of bands like the Ramones, the Clash, and the Sex Pistols challenging song structure and pop culture, we have Blink 182 indulging in copying crappy "melodic hardcore". We have "math metal", combining the most unlistenable of two worlds to create some truly useless atonal noise....."

Isn't that the truth...really good review.

Anonymous (November 27, 2004)

More relevant for their ability to annoy than their ability to rock.

I've always thought that most people claim to like the Sex Pistols for the same reason they claim to like the Beatles: because they read somewhere that they were influential, and not because they actually listen to the record a lot, identified with the lyrics, and were able to rock out to it. As BSD is the poster child for mad poserism on this site, I suspect that's probably the case here... even if he doesn't admit it.

joeg (November 27, 2004)

Score is for the pistols and the review.

(calmly awaits obligatory "the Pistols are not punk! they're just a boy band dressed up in weird clothing!" comments)

ElVaquero (November 27, 2004)

great review.

swingline (November 26, 2004)

good review.

Anonymous (November 26, 2004)

This record sucks.

The Clash >>>> Sex Pistols.

Anonymous (November 26, 2004)

For once i agree on what this kid has to say.

Anonymous (November 26, 2004)

who are they?

adam (November 26, 2004)

I used the UK cover art when posting this because I'm a big Pistols nerd and the first review posted of this here (the short one from 2001) had the pink art.

Oh, and BSD: You get a lot of shit from the kids for voicing your opinion, but you are without a doubt one of my favorite voices in the community here. Awesome angle for the review. This is easily one of my favorite albums of all time.

-adam

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