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The Ends - Concrete Disappointment (Cover Artwork)

The Ends

The Ends: Concrete DisappointmentConcrete Disappointment (2004)
Dirtnap Records

Reviewer Rating: 3.5


Contributed by: adamAdam
(others by this writer | submit your own)

Listen to the first 30 seconds of The Undertones' "Family Entertainment" and you'll get a fairly good idea of the approach The Ends are taking. In that song, Feargal Sharkey never really breaks into his trademark vocal quiver, instead relying on a marble-mouthed fuzz very similar to the style Ends s.
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Listen to the first 30 seconds of The Undertones' "Family Entertainment" and you'll get a fairly good idea of the approach The Ends are taking. In that song, Feargal Sharkey never really breaks into his trademark vocal quiver, instead relying on a marble-mouthed fuzz very similar to the style Ends singer Ian takes to dizzying extremes on Concrete Disappointment. With a vicious Dead Boys snarl and some vintage guitar work in the vein of Johnny Thunders, The Ends are begging critics to rip them up for being derivative, but it's really hard to do so when the results are so damn enjoyable.

The album-opening "Pucker Up" jumps out the gates with a rocking piano backing one of the more memorable punk singles of `04. There's something about including a revved-up honky tonk piano sound in a punk song that just works remarkably well (Rancid's "Crane Fist" comes to mind, although this is far more up-tempo). The band takes the sound they establish on that tune, by all accounts a little more classic rock'n'roll than their previous full-length, and keep it up through the next handful of songs. "New Rome" is an interesting change of pace. Previously released as a single (b/w "Saw It Comin," which is also included here) the song takes Ian's vocals to a distorted extreme and features a wonderfully raucous and screeching guitar solo. The following "Nice Quiet You" has the band trying their hardest to channel every bit of New York Dolls sleaze that they can (and pretty much succeeding). The latter half of the record never really breaks out of form and that holds back Concrete Disappointment from being as dynamic as it could have been, but with lots of high-energy material like "Animal" and "Same Old Solutions" it really doesn't seem like much of a problem.

Austin's The Ends are headed down a much-travelled path, but they do it remarkably well and with a youthful energy that's hard to deny. Despite the myriad of classic influences The Ends tap, they show a lot of their own character on Concrete Disappointment and that's not something you can emulate.

 

 
People who liked this also liked:
The Lillingtons - Death by TelevisionBouncing Souls - The Gold RecordSixer - Beautiful TrashThe Undertones - The UndertonesThe Loved Ones - Keep Your HeartThe Hatepinks - Plastic Bag AmbitionsFilthy Thieving Bastards - My Pappy Was a PistolFucked Up - The Chemistry of Common LifeDead to Me - Cuban BallerinaThe Nice Boys - The Nice Boys

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Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not respon sible for them in any way. Seriously.
Anonymous (January 11, 2005)

"Pucker Up" sucks ass. Ugh.

-Chinatown

gladimnotemo (January 11, 2005)

Again, "Pucker Up" is such an amazing song. The singer kinda has like a Duane Peters' spit/attitude with a Stiv Bators voice.

Anonymous (January 11, 2005)

I remember one time this band's song Pucker Up was mp3 of the week and I ended up listening to it fifty million times a day because it's really that good.

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