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Out Hud - Let Us Never Speak Of It Again (Cover Artwork)

Out Hud

Out Hud: Let Us Never Speak Of It AgainLet Us Never Speak Of It Again (2005)
Kranky

Reviewer Rating: 4.5


Contributed by: danperroneDan Perrone
(others by this writer | submit your own)

The new album by electronic dance-punkers Out Hud, Let Us Never Speak Of It Again, is an album which will either be loved or hated; the band has gone through quite the transformation since their critically-acclaimed debut S.T.R.E.E.T.D.A.D.. However, the result is rather stunning, and those reluctan.
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The new album by electronic dance-punkers Out Hud, Let Us Never Speak Of It Again, is an album which will either be loved or hated; the band has gone through quite the transformation since their critically-acclaimed debut S.T.R.E.E.T.D.A.D.. However, the result is rather stunning, and those reluctant to change should really try to find it within themselves to give this a chance, for it is a fine piece of work.

Gone are the darker, more repetitive jams found on Out Hud's debut. The songs found on Let Us Never Speak Of It Again are infinitely more accessible, and generally sound much brighter than the band's sound of old. Instead of epic tunes replaying what was essentially the same pattern over and over again (not that that produced bad results), the band has turned to a more concise, interesting approach to their songwriting. There are ten songs to be found here, and many of them end around the four or five-minute mark. This can be attributed to the most obvious of changes to the band's formulas: vocals. And female vocals at that.

Of course, it's easy to be a skeptic and gawk at the addition of vocals. Surprisingly, the voices of drummer Phyllis Forbes and cellist Molly Schnick complement the music quite well; they add somewhat of a poppier element to the bass and drum-heavy rhythms, and they make the songs much more enjoyable to boot. Had these songs remained strictly instrumental, they would probably immediately be dismissed as boring or pretentious, for they could not possibly work by themselves.

Regardless of how nice the vocals sound, I cannot complete this review giving credit only to that one aspect of what is truly a complete sound. The bass work on Let Us Never Speak Of It Again is out of this world; check out the slap bass on the album's top track, "How Long," and the !!!-esque riff on the album's first single, "One Life To Leave," for proof. The percussion is also top-notch, ranging from a track chock full of innumerable tom beats ("The Song So Good They Named It Thrice") to rapid-fire, almost rave-sounding drum rhythms ("The Stoked American"). Out Hud have truly refined their sound on this album, and the results are better than most anyone could have expected.

My only complaint is that the album is a tad hard to sit through in one sitting, due to the length of some songs. Note that this isn't due to repetition, because even the lengthier songs have riffs that build off of and on top of one another, creating an explosive sound. Aside from that, I feel that this album should be enjoyed by most, especially if you want some extremely fun music to listen to. It'll be exciting to see where Out Hud takes it from here, and hopefully this isn't the peak for this excellent band.

Standout Tracks:

  • "How Long"
  • "One Life To Leave"
  • "2005: A Face Odyssey"
  • "The Stoked American"

 

 
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Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not respon sible for them in any way. Seriously.
Anonymous (May 30, 2005)

the girls in this band are punk as fuck, score is for them

darkstarm (May 30, 2005)

but is there something "punk" about it?

Anonymous (May 29, 2005)

there's almost nothing punk about out hud

Anonymous (May 28, 2005)

I'm aware that dance music typically is longer than the typical punk song, thats why I had called more dance oriented. However, 8 minutes is a long time, even if you're dancing, plus there's the whole "punk" aspect of it.

yellowtrash (May 28, 2005)

If anyone is aware of dance culture, songs generally tend to go on for a long time. It's part of the minimalist build up, and also, people dance for long periods of time!

theundergroundscene (May 27, 2005)

Oh, and also, you are still a loser.

theundergroundscene (May 27, 2005)

Actually, ElVaquero, that was not written by me. It was written by my pal who I worked with on my old site (theundergroundscene.net). He submitted a few under this name.

For the past year or so, it has been only me.

ElVaquero (May 27, 2005)

Instead of trusting the review, I found out instead that the reviewer gave a perfect score to a Shadows Fall album. Whoops.

Anonymous (May 27, 2005)

My major complaint with a lot these more dance oriented "dance punk" bands is that their songs go on for too long. !!! and LCD Soundsystem both are guilty of this.

Anonymous (May 27, 2005)

"it's for you" is a really fun song.

Anonymous (May 27, 2005)

I liked Street Dad quite a bit more. This type of sound, lately, is being improved by other bands. This album puts me off a bit...

Anonymous (May 27, 2005)

hell yeah

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