Punknews.org
Embrace The End - Counting Hallways To The Left (Cover Artwork)

Embrace The End

Embrace The End: Counting Hallways To The LeftCounting Hallways To The Left (2005)
Abacus Recordings

Reviewer Rating: 3


Contributed by: AnchorsAnchors
(others by this writer | submit your own)

You know what...metalcore just may have a few tricks left in the bag after all. Sure, the genre isn't liable to become a hotbed of artistic creativity and expression, and I don't think any bands will be incorporating banjo breakdowns or flute solos any time soon, but a few bands still exist that can.
Amazon


You know what...metalcore just may have a few tricks left in the bag after all. Sure, the genre isn't liable to become a hotbed of artistic creativity and expression, and I don't think any bands will be incorporating banjo breakdowns or flute solos any time soon, but a few bands still exist that can make some solid records in the genre. This is proven by Embrace The End's Abacus debut, Counting Hallways To The Left, which while not inventive in the slightest, impresses with a solid songwriting craft and unrelenting intensity.

Sounding like a much less chaotic version of label mates Ion Dissonance, the band obviously has a sound musical head on their collective shoulders. The dual-vocal attack works well for the six-piece, effortlessly moving between mid-range screams, frenetic shrieks, and low, guttural growling. The song structures, while technically sound, offer little reprieve from the genre standard blast beats and breakdowns, but even that seems to be executed with a little more flare, a little more gusto than bands playing similar music. The band wastes little time getting straight into their groove, as "Carbombs And Conversations" speeds out of the gate with reckless abandon, and never gives time to look back, and "Memento Mori" carries an excellent groove amidst the range of screams and speedy metal riffing to keep fans of hardcore and metal alike happy. It's even got some solid, melodic guitar undercurrents that sound great underneath the harsh layer of screamed vocals and relentless drum fills. Fluid as all of these songs are, they do on occasion fall into a lot of the same metalcore ruts, with too many breakdowns and overuse of the double bass drumming leading the offenses. I'll be damned though if Embrace The End doesn't finish off the album with their two strongest tracks. The speedy and chaotic "After Me The Floods" demolishes everything in its path with untouched ferocity and great musicianship, while the closer "The Father's Right Hand" is heavy and pummeling, while retaining the same cohesion established up to this point.

At its core, sure, it's still the same music that a myriad of other bands are putting out, but Embrace The End reside a cut above the rest. Their penchant for lightning quick, technical guitar work and a wide range of vocal styles will do well for them in future endeavors. If they can say goodbye to a lot of the things that make the genre cliché, this will absolutely be a band to look out for in the very near future.

 


Please login or register to post comments.What are the benefits of having a Punknews.org account?
  • Share your opinion by posting comments on the stories that interest you
  • Rate music and bands and help shape the weekly top ten
  • Let Punknews.org use your ratings to help you find bands and albums you might like
  • Customize features on the site to get the news the way you want.
Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not respon sible for them in any way. Seriously.
Anonymous (September 21, 2005)

Straight Edge Failure

Stuck in a serrated life
Rough Cut and Jagged Edged
Wanna be good and so I've pledged
To fight the good fight

Straight Edge Failure
Vistory Leaves again

Wanna be good and get along
Feelin weak so actin strong
Wanna drink and smoke and still belong
But that don't make a good posi song

Straight Edge Failure
Victory leaves again
Straight Edge Failure
Time For Living
Embrace The End

Stuck in a serrated life
Rough Cut and Jagged Edged
Wanna be good and so I've pledged
To fight the good fight
Straight Edge !

-Instant Asshole2005
http://www.myspace.com/instantasshole

Anonymous (September 18, 2005)

"I donâ??t think any bands will be incorporating banjo breakdowns"

The Chariot has a banjo breakdown on their cd "everything is alive..."

Mastodon has a banjo breakdown on one of the tracks on 'Leviathan', too.

Anonymous (September 17, 2005)

"Sounding like a much less chaotic version of label mates Ion Dissonance"

everybody, reach your hand up if you listen to ion dissonance for anything else than the chaos.

crazytoledo (September 16, 2005)

The score should be a 7.

I dont lknow though, there ok I guess, better than a lot of shit on this site.

Anchors (September 16, 2005)

I have no problem with the name Embrace The End, it's the current band called 'Embrace' that really pisses me off.

Anonymous (September 16, 2005)

go to americasarmy.ca for the propagandhi song

Anonymous (September 16, 2005)

After the Embrace of the mid 80s the word should have been retired for band name purposes.

RondoMondo (September 16, 2005)

The Chariot aren't bad. I was supposed to see them tomorrow with the Red Chord, but my band's playing a show that night.

I still haven't heard anything from the new Kids Like Us. Does anyone have that second Propagandhi song "Die Marschiert"? I can't find it anywhere.

Anonymous (September 16, 2005)

Spazz's "Spudboy" actually does have a banjo breakdown. It's amazing.

punkcorekid (September 16, 2005)

i've heard that shit on the chariot cd, it's not a breakdown...it's a fucking intro. the chariot sucks anyway.

the new kids like us has a banjo breakdown at the end of the last song. i know they're not metalcore, but thought i'd point it out anyway.

Anonymous (September 16, 2005)

"I donâ??t think any bands will be incorporating banjo breakdowns"

The Chariot has a banjo breakdown on their cd "everything is alive..."

Exclusive Streams

Sponsored


Newest Reviews

Punknews.org Team

Other Places to Go