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New Electric - New Electric (Cover Artwork)

New Electric

New Electric: New ElectricNew Electric (2005)
The Perpetual Motion Machine

Reviewer Rating: 3


Contributed by: Matt_WhelihanMatt Whelihan
(others by this writer | submit your own)

New Electric are a clangorous, rocking, fuzzed out instrumental act featuring members of De La Hoya (you know, that band some of Marathon used to be in), Nakatomi Plaza (you know, that building from "Die Hard"), and Rolo Tomase (do you know? 'Cause I don't). While all four members of the band studie.
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New Electric are a clangorous, rocking, fuzzed out instrumental act featuring members of De La Hoya (you know, that band some of Marathon used to be in), Nakatomi Plaza (you know, that building from "Die Hard"), and Rolo Tomase (do you know? 'Cause I don't). While all four members of the band studied jazz at some point in time, you will only find scant traces of it here. Instead, New Electric runs noise rock head on into some straightforward heavy rock and roll. When the smoke clears, what is left is a mess of brash guitar slinging that can be just as pensive as it is abrasive. New Electric can come out screeching, pounding, and ripping solos that shock the senses, or they can kick back and lay down some melodic movements and airy space.

The EP opens with "Surf," a driving, guitars-turned-to-eleven number that never lets up over the course of three minutes. New Electric construct a wall of noise, but each brick can be distinguished. So while one guitar is feeding back, and the other shredding, you can still pick up on a bass lead.

After "Surf," the band assert that they are not a one-trick pony by busting out the atmospheric and beautifully melodic "Don't Send Me Home." The song opens with one guitar laying down an almost synth-like backing, while the bass takes care of some melody and the other guitar stabs in and out with some jagged chords. From there the band alternate back and forth between the song's main riff (a high-pitched pull off deal), some dips into ambient and layered guitar, and a couple quick flourishes of the heavier rock from the EP's opener. The song may be nearly six minutes long, but you won't notice it thanks to plenty of variation.

"Bananarchy" and "Circus" close out the EP and bring the band's two styles together as they shift between some heavy riffing and atmospheric guitar runs that put the fret board to work. The only problem is when a distracting cock rock vibe springs up during some of the harmonizing and solos.

Unlike a lot of instrumental acts, New Electric know when to an end a song. They also don't rely on repetition very often, but instead continue to chart new courses away from a song's initial starting point. Still, if you don't dig instrumental music they aren't doing much to draw in the "vocals necessary" crowd.

 


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Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not respon sible for them in any way. Seriously.
Anonymous (October 18, 2005)

A great and honest review, Matt. New Electric are currently writing for a full length which they plan to record this winter or early 2006 and will be playing select shows and weekends this fall/winter in the northeast.

For more info, or to order New Electric's s/t CDEP visit:
The Perpetual Motion Machine

Anonymous (October 15, 2005)

If you are going to use movie references for your band name, make it as obscure as possible. Donnie Darko references will be punishable by death.

Anonymous (October 15, 2005)

instrumental surf..... man or astroman?

etwiels88 (October 15, 2005)

nice review

Anonymous (October 14, 2005)

mp3?

Anonymous (October 14, 2005)

" the "vocals necessary" crowd." Exactly the type of crowd I want to avoid. The term "close-minded" seems appropriate. Anyone know any good instrumental surf/ska/reggae records?

-Not-To-Regret

Anonymous (October 14, 2005)

this ep is incredible, it gets better with each listen. it only gets a nine 'cause it's only got four songs

Anonymous (October 14, 2005)

Rolo Tomase is the name Guy Pearce's Edmund Exley calls the anonymous hoodlum who killed his policeman father on the street years ago and made him want to become a cop in "LA Confidential." Having been told the story by Exley in a rather personal moment, Kevin Spacey's Jack Vincennes cleverly uses the name as he sits dying on a kitchen chair to help Exley beyond the grave, by giving the name to the man who killed him: James Cromwell's corrupt Captain Dudley Smith, who unwittingly asks Exley to look into Rolo Tomase, raising Exley's suspicions.

Where's the Hilary Duff review?

killyouridols (October 14, 2005)

best intro to a review ever

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