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The Replacements - Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash (Cover Artwork)

The Replacements

The Replacements: Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the TrashSorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash (1981)
Twin/Tone

Reviewer Rating: 5
User Rating:


Contributed by: GlassPipeMurderGlassPipeMurder
(others by this writer | submit your own)

In retrospect, and with their breakup 15 years in the past, it's much easier to stomach the Replacements' constant evolution and cycles of stylistic departure. One can only imagine some angsty Midwest teenager finding his new favorite band in 1982's Stink only to hear a different band entirely upon .
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In retrospect, and with their breakup 15 years in the past, it's much easier to stomach the Replacements' constant evolution and cycles of stylistic departure. One can only imagine some angsty Midwest teenager finding his new favorite band in 1982's Stink only to hear a different band entirely upon picking up a copy of Let It Be just two years later. It's certainly a good thing there weren't online message boards back then.

None of that really matters in this case, though, as Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash is both the Replacements' first album and their best. Sure, albums like Pleased to Meet Me and Tim transcended genres, record labels, and helped birth the fledgling aesthetic of indie rock, but Sorry Ma did more. At a time when "hardcore punk" often meant nothing more than playing as fast and abrasive as possible, the album never sacrificed its pop appeal for throat-searing screams and whiplash speed. While the bulk of the movement was focusing their energy against social norms, the Reagan era, and the established roots of rock ??n' roll, the Replacements were writing 32-bar pop songs like "Love You ??Til Friday" and "I'm In Trouble" to a spanking punk rhythm and grating guitars.

What's most fascinating is that the band seems the most comfortable on this set of songs than anytime thereafter despite founding drummer Chris Mars' confession "We were confused about what we were" as part of the hardcore scene. However, it's certainly easy to understand why. The ??Mats were playing better than the majority of their contemporaries, and that may have been the problem. From the flirtations with golden-era rock ??n' roll in "Shutup" to the confident chops and pop of "I'm in Trouble" to the loungy "Johnny's Gonna Die" (which would later find itself referenced on NOFX's "Jaw Knee Music"), the Replacements were somewhat of the black sheep in hardcore's early years of distortion-and-scream, 50-second gut punches.

That's not to say the punk spirit isn't overflowing in every song, though. Songs like "More Cigarettes," "I Hate Music," "Raised in the City" and their smile-and-wink to Twin Cities rivals Hüsker Dü in "Something to Dü" harness the youthful rebellion that gave the genre its credibility. The difference is that while most hardcore bands at the time played poorly to distance themselves from mainstream music, the Replacements played extremely well and distanced themselves from everyone.

 

 
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The Replacements - Let It BeThe Replacements - TimThe Gaslight Anthem - Sink or SwimThe Lawrence Arms - Oh! Calcutta!Off With Their Heads - From The BottomDillinger Four - C I V I L W A RDear Landlord - Dream HomesTeenage Bottlerocket - They Came from the ShadowsJawbreaker - 24 Hour Revenge TherapyThe Gaslight Anthem - The '59 Sound

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Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not respon sible for them in any way. Seriously.
mikexdude (June 9, 2009)

Whisper words of wisdom, let it beeeeeeeee

Torgo (June 8, 2009)

is the twelfth and final studio album by the English rock band The Beatles. It was released on 8 May 1970 by the band's Apple Records label shortly after the group's announced breakup.

Most of Let It Be was recorded in January 1969, before the recording and release of the album Abbey Road. For this reason, some critics and fans, such as Mark Lewisohn, argue that Abbey Road should really be considered the group's final album and Let It Be the penultimate. Let It Be was originally intended to be released prior to Abbey Road at some point during mid-1969 under the title Get Back but the Beatles were unhappy with this version of the album, which was mixed and compiled by Glyn Johns, and it was temporarily shelved. A new version of the album was created from the studio tapes by Phil Spector in 1970 and then finally released as Let It Be. The album acts as a soundtrack album for the 1970 motion picture of the same name, which is a documentary film of the band rehearsing and recording the album. While two songs from the sessions were released as singles prior to this album's release, "Get Back" and "Let It Be", the songs were remixed by Spector for release on this album.

The rehearsals and recording sessions for the album did not run smoothly due to the increasing level of acrimony between the four Beatles. The group bickered and argued throughout the album's production. George Harrison, at one point during the rehearsals, walked out and quit the group after severely arguing with both Paul McCartney and John Lennon, only to be coaxed back some days later. The film version is famous for showcasing a number of conflicts between the group members and has frequently been referred to as a documentary intended to show the making of an album but instead showing "the break-up of a band".[citation needed]

Critical and fan reaction to the album on its release was fairly negative. Opinion on the album today is largely divided, though most critics appear to regard Let it Be as weaker than most of the Beatles' previous works. Despite receiving a largely negative review from Rolling Stone magazine at the time of its release, the album was later ranked number 86 in the magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time in 2003.[1]

McCartney oversaw the release of Let it Be...Naked in 2003, an alternative version of the album where McCartney's personal vision replaces that of Spector.

scientistrock (June 8, 2009)

mikexdude: dead to me.

elliot (June 8, 2009)

Quite a bold statement to call this their best album. Although I still don't agree, you did a pretty good job of defending your opinion.

SloaneDaley (June 8, 2009)

I dunno if hardcore punk bands in the 80's scene really fit that description of playing poorly and following a similar formula whatnot Flipper didn't sound like Naked Raygun didn't sound like Ill Repute didn't sound like Descendents, didn't sound like Reagan Youth didn't sound like NoMeansNo.

MrStylson (June 8, 2009)

Great band, great album, great review

OverDefined (June 8, 2009)

"The difference is that while most hardcore bands at the time played poorly to distance themselves from mainstream music, the Replacements played extremely well and distanced themselves from everyone."

Not a fan of this band, but that is good review writing.

mikexdude (June 7, 2009)

Let it Be?

Why are we all talking about the Beatles? LOLzzzzsesdvg

GlassPipeMurder (June 7, 2009)

Let it Be is certainly more influential, but I find myself skipping some of its tracks. There aren't any here that I would skip.

PregnantOctopus (June 7, 2009)

Yeah, this is not their best album. Let It Be is.

Kurasuke (June 7, 2009)

Good album, but certainly not their best.

mattramone (June 6, 2009)

When Red Tape Parade comes to America, expect a drunken cover of "Careless."

Scott12xu (June 6, 2009)

Brilliant album. Review hit it on the head. While these guys were lumped in with the HC crowd, they played better and had dreams of making it big, unlike the MRR-style bands. Someone (Low Giordano?) told me that the reason the songs were so many and so short (18 songs; less than 37 mins. total) was that they wanted to create their own version of Wire's "Pink Flag" (The 'Mats were 3 songs short, though).

notfeelingcreative (June 6, 2009)

Amazing record, that is all.

Cos (June 5, 2009)

inagreendase, you really need to get "Let It Be." Its probably my favorite, and might be the most punk title simply because they stole it from the Beatles just for the hell of it.

lostandclowned (June 5, 2009)

"Song for the Huskers who don't do drugs." Hahaha.

scientistrock (June 5, 2009)

Whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa! Hold up! Best album? Really?

DrGunn (June 5, 2009)

it's a fun album but honestly i think it sounds like they were trying a little too hard (by acting like they weren't trying at all). to call this their best album is insanity, they got so much better at writing songs as the years went by.

the packet is fucking hilarious.

preston (June 5, 2009)

Shit yes. I recently required this. The soundtrack to making trouble in High School.

655321 (June 5, 2009)

Absolute classic. I'm surprised there was no reveiw for this already.

77punker (June 5, 2009)

Great album from a great band. I saw them live, obviously many years ago & they kicked ass!! Nice review.

MN_punkmaster-skaman (June 5, 2009)

Score is for the review. Thank you for doing this!!! It's about time somebody wrote one on this album. These guys have had a huge influence on the punk sound whether a band realized it or not. 10/10 album

Torgo (June 5, 2009)

... I mean Let It Be, oops. Score is for Let It Be and Tim

Torgo (June 5, 2009)

Oh Brian you're missing out. I think it has the best Side 1 of any Replacements album

inagreendase (June 5, 2009)

as Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash is both the Replacements' first album and their best

No wai. It's good, but come onnn.

1. Don't Tell a Soul
2. Tim
(sometimes reversed)
3. Sorry Ma
4. All Shook Down

Still need to get Stink, Pleased, Hootenanny and especially Let It Be.

Torgo (June 5, 2009)

PS: I almost forgot it has the most punk album name of all time. Good review Blacklung.

Torgo (June 5, 2009)

Fuck, I should have reviewed this. Great album, great band.

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