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Various - Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie: Reinterpreting Black Flag [12-inch] (Cover Artwork)

Various

Various: Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie: Reinterpreting Black Flag [12-inch]Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie: Reinterpreting Black Flag [12-inch] (2010)
The Secret Life of Records

Reviewer Rating: 2.5


Contributed by: InaGreendaseBrian
(others by this writer | submit your own)

It's practically impossible to label Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie: Reintepreting Black Flag as anything but a novelty release. While punk supergroup Me First and the Gimme Gimmes take classic songs from antique genres and freshen them up with a melodic punk rock spirit, the collaborators on Gimmie Gimmie Gi.


It's practically impossible to label Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie: Reintepreting Black Flag as anything but a novelty release. While punk supergroup Me First and the Gimme Gimmes take classic songs from antique genres and freshen them up with a melodic punk rock spirit, the collaborators on Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie have chosen the opposite route: They've taken a "six-pack" of classic Black Flag songs and reinterpreted them in styles ranging from lightly twangy country balladry ("Nervous Breakdown") to something like a sitcom musical theme from the Leave It to Beaver era ("Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie"), trying to imagine the band in a time before punk even really existed. What's weirder is that some of these collaborators were actually in Black Flag: Keith Morris, Dez Cadena and Kira Roessler all appear on various tracks--not to mention Mike Watt and Blondie's Jimmy Destri.

Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie tries to settle with the Black Flag aesthetic by being sold as a 12" EP, but that's about the only bit of lineage you'll be able to establish. This shit is just weird. There's sort of a surf rock rendition for "Rise Above," taking the band's anthem of uprising and defanging it of its scrappy rebellious nature, rendering it just a weirdly relaxed lounge toss-off that happens to have some subvertist lyrics. "Nervous Breakdown" is like a bad art thesis, with Morris' demented vocal theatrics transformed into a mental patient's oddly calm and articulated self-analysis.

It's all really hard to take in or actually forcibly enjoy. And what's worse is that there's a cover of Johnny Cash's "In the Jailhouse Now" randomly placed in the middle of the track listing. It's hard to make sense of the connection, if there is any, and if there were at least any sense of thematic cohesion to this project, this song sort of snuffs it.

This is definitely an experiment gone confusingly awry. Black Flag was never broken despite Morris's cries to "fix me" in a certain song of the same name; it's advice that perhaps should not have been taken.

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Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not respon sible for them in any way. Seriously.
DangerMolotovArmstrong (August 19, 2010)

i thought this was some kinda weird joke but apparently not.

lushj (August 18, 2010)

I am an anti-christ! I am a subvertist!

... nah, doesn't have the same ring.

lushj (August 18, 2010)

"some subvertist lyrics"

You mean subversive, right? Or is there some group we join that make us subvertists, like anarchists, socialists...

Cos (August 18, 2010)

I have a version of "Nervious Breakdown" by Ryan Adams that goes all kindsa country. I dig it.

hey_ska (August 18, 2010)

We Are by Cloak/dagger is such a good fucking album.

wallofyouth (August 18, 2010)

alright brian, i guess i have to finally speak up:

"It's all really hard to take in or actually forcibly enjoy." = 2.5 stars

cloak/dagger's we are = 3.5
pissed jeans' king of jeans = 3.5
torche's meanderthal = 3.5

those are three of my favorite albums in recent memory, and i think probably everything i've loved in the last 4 years has gotten a 3 or 3.5 from you. reviews are opinions, i get that, but i think you need to start utilizing the rest of the numbers between 1 and 5. namely 0, 1, 4, and 5. don't be so conservative with your stars! i know it's been debated so damn much here, so i hate to bring it up again, but i had a few beers this evening so you get my internet tough guy act.

weegmc (August 17, 2010)

Whatever happened to Black Velvet Flag?

hobbzoid (August 17, 2010)

lame.

johngentile (August 17, 2010)

I think this is a fair review, but I disagree with it.

I think Kira's take on Nervous Breakdown is really clever. It takes the seminal punk anthem and turns it into a patsy cline number (which I think is really clever), but it still is a great song showing Ginn's ability to write one hell of a tune.

Also, as for "In the Jailhouse now", Johnny Cash did record that song but it has been around since the turn of the century. I think it was included because the whole vibe of the lyrics seem to fit right in line with Black Flag's lyrics, but is from early Americana. Plus, I think the image of Keith Morris dancing and singing in the jail cell with glee is hilarious.

Also, this release has some SST alumni like Joe Carducci and Mike Watt which is neat.

Again, I think this review is fair, but I think the songs are more than novelty. Rather, I think they evidence of how strong the original songs are and how they transcend genre.

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