Touché Amoré / Make Do and Mend - Split [7-inch] (Cover Artwork)
Staff Pick

Touché Amoré / Make Do and Mend

Touché Amoré / Make Do and Mend: Split [7-inch]

Split [7-inch] (2010)

6131 / Panic


4
Touché Amoré's second split of the year comes with Make Do and Mend. Both bands have carved out pretty unique niches in their respective hardcore and punk scenes (essentially the same one in some circles), so this was a pretty anticipated 7" which definitely delivers for the most part. TA's sid...

Touché Amoré's second split of the year comes with Make Do and Mend. Both bands have carved out pretty unique niches in their respective hardcore and punk scenes (essentially the same one in some circles), so this was a pretty anticipated 7" which definitely delivers for the most part.

TA's side is recorded with the same rough quality their Searching for a Pulse side of the La Dispute split was done with. Though it muffles the tracks a bit, they're not a bad example of the band's raw, modern hardcore/screamo revival expertise. "Smoke Signals" has a clustered, smoggy approach that takes on a bit of an older screamo "waltz" of sorts in its last few seconds, while "Hideaways" is a faster one, more akin to the beginning of "Honest Sleep." But precisely halfway through the latter, much of the band drops out, leaving Jeremy Bolm to yell his scratchy declarations (one such earnest admission being "You can't expect to understand love when you admire lonely singers") over just some delicate guitar picking, a pulsing bassline and clicking percussion. These songs might not be bad as respective wholes, but this particular moment is one of the best the band's offered so far in its brief discography.

Make Do and Mend, meanwhile, slaughter. The recording is huge and punchy, and while it may be the band at their most vehemently Caution-esque (something they would temper for their recent full-length), it might be their best release to date, including said LP. The bone-chilling "Hand Me Downs" is as aggressive and desperate as the band's ever been; you can practically hear the saliva forming in James Carroll's mouth when he howls "I'll take whatever comforts I can get." There's either a guest vocalist or backup vocal that provides a thrilling moment of dynamism too, as if you might not be into it enough already. "Cobwebs" is a more restrained counter, but its thudded medium tempo is heavy and compelling, and the chorus pounds through the tension punctually.

If you haven't checked this out already, get on it.

STREAM
Touché Amoré - Hideaways
Make Do and Mend - Cobwebs