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Old Firm Casuals - Old Firm Casuals [7-inch] (Cover Artwork)

Old Firm Casuals

Old Firm Casuals: Old Firm Casuals [7-inch]Old Firm Casuals [7-inch] (2011)
Oi! the boat

Reviewer Rating: 3


Contributed by: JohnGentileJohnGentile
(others by this writer | submit your own)

When first listening to the first release from Lars Frederiksen's Old Firm Casuals, I was ready to trash it for being unoriginal and unnecessary...but upon further consideration, I would have been the one that missed the point of the release. This release features Old Firm Casuals playing by-the-.
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When first listening to the first release from Lars Frederiksen's Old Firm Casuals, I was ready to trash it for being unoriginal and unnecessary...but upon further consideration, I would have been the one that missed the point of the release.

This release features Old Firm Casuals playing by-the-numbers Oi! and street punk. They tear through four tunes based on fairly standard punk riffs and progression without changing the tempo or even tuning. The lyrics reference how the band is proud to be the band they are, their working class background, and how they will break the noses of people who don't like them (twice!).

But, to be fair, while the topics aren't groundbreaking, and the music doesn't sound new per se when viewed as music for the sake of music, the EP is actually pretty fun and a worthy exercise. Frederiksen retains his skill in crafting a song in the classic two-and-half-a-minute style. The music is catchy and well-executed. The band clearly reveres the music that they are playing, so much so that they sly pay homage to the Clash's iconic "Clash City Rockers".

Now, this type of music has been done before almost 30 years ago, and this release doesn't really add much for consideration. But, while the record is inessential, it's not pointless.

Were Erik Petersen of Mischief Brew to release a record in the style of pre-war folk, I'd call it an interesting experiment. Were Jack Terricloth of World/Inferno to release an album of jazz standards, I'd call it a fun diversion. Were John Joseph of the Cro-Mags to release an album of Bad Brain covers, I'd call it an iconic musician paying respect to his mentors. If these artists get the benefit of the doubt, so should Frederiksen, who was in Rancid, one of the most influential punk bands of the '90s.

Here, Frederiksen seems to be paying dues to the music that inspired and informed him. And while Oi! music can be monotonous, it does have a certain catchiness and reverence for pop music. As Lars and his band tear through these four cuts, they demonstrate how early punk was so effective in both how it utilized the Chuck Berry/Bo Diddly formula, and how it ignored it at appropriate times. Likewise, in playing these straightforward but rocking tunes, Frederiksen highlights how Rancid, love them or hate them, really did know how to write a classic rock song that had both catchiness and substance.

Although this release is likely for fans only, those that are more interested in discovering Frederiksen's roots might also find themselves discovering the roots of punk itself.

 

 
People who liked this also liked:
Rancid - Rancid (2000)Rancid - ...Honor Is All We KnowDescendents - Everything SucksLagwagon - TrashedTim Armstrong - A Poet's LifeOFF! - OFF!NOFX - Self EntitledPropagandhi - Failed StatesPropagandhi - Today's Empires, Tomorrow's AshesDescendents - I Don't Want to Grow Up

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Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not respon sible for them in any way. Seriously.
MarvTheZombie (July 26, 2011)

Just got this vinyl in the mail yesterday and by god, what an awesome record it is. The only real reason I started listening to OFC was because Lars was involved, and that man can almost do no wrong, as far as I'm concerned (huge Rancid fan, call it a bias). It took a couple listens online until I really started to love this band, and thus ordered the vinyl, which currently sits on my record player at any given time. Each track is a straight-forward fist of edgy, chin-up tunes. While 'Apocalypse Coming' does bear resemblance to 'Clash City Rockers' and a particular tune by The Who, it still kicks a serious amount of ass and charges ahead on a good pace, slower than the three other tracks on the record, which are all legitimately boss. Buy it.

stayaway (June 22, 2011)

I haven't heard this yet, but it seems like your review pretty much nailed down what I would have guessed it to sound like. I don't get why you referred to Rancid in past tense throughout this review though, as if they've broken up.

mattramone (June 22, 2011)

I was expecting to hate this but I actually ended up enjoying it. It reminds me of being a kid, and sometimes there's nothing wrong with a little nostalgia.

dinosaur_fartsounds (June 22, 2011)

"Here, Frederiksen seems to be paying dues to the music that inspired and informed him" -over the last few Rancid records and Bastards albums, he does that quite a bit.

Hey_Asshole (June 21, 2011)

Ok, we are talking about a dubious throwback Oi/street punk record. That said, why is the lack of varying tempo or tuning changes even worth mentioning?

slazey (June 21, 2011)

Sounds intriguing- but as a Partick Thistle fan, I don't think I'm allowed to have a band named 'Old Firm Casuals' in my record collection. Oh well.

thirtyseconds (June 21, 2011)

They don't EVEN change the tuning? fuck...

pito (June 21, 2011)

I love this record and I hate music that pretends to sound new

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