Image Philadelphia lawmakers are currently considering a bill which could have severe repercussions for the city's music scene. The bill, numbered 100267 and subtitled Referred to the Committee on Licenses and Inspections, was proposed by Darrell Clarke and Bill Greenlee. The effect of the bill is to create a new list of requirements and restrictions to which promoters will need to follow. The City Paper digested the bill and provided this summary:
Under the proposed rules, promoters would have to apply for a permit from the Philadelphia Police Department (PPD) 30 days before every single event -- meaning if you promote a weekly club night, that's 52 permit applications per year . More than just a bureaucratic nightmare, this would all but abolish last-minute shows or pickup parties. These applications would have to include detailed security plans, the promoter's business-privilege-license number, the venue's capacity and the expected crowd. Perhaps most importantly, the bill would hold promoters liable for the actions of the crowds at the events they promote.

Additionally, the bill requires that every permit application include a copy of the contract between the venue and the promoter -- in effect, making rental prices and rates for each individual promoter a matter of public record . To make matters worse, the cops can deny a permit for any reason and without explanation up to 10 days before the event -- which could devastate businesses that fronted costs, to say nothing of destroying the credibility of those trying to book events.

A petition has been launched, but concerned citizens may find more traction by contacting their council person directly by letter mail or fax.

The Philadelphia independent music scene has spawned a diverse range of bands including Paint It Black, Atom and His Package, Blacklisted, The Dead Milkmen, The A-Sides, Anti-Flag, Hot Cross, mewithoutYou, The Wonder Years and many more.