Talk To Angels - This Broken Home (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

Talk To Angels

Talk To Angels: This Broken Home

This Broken Home (2013)

self-released


3
British bands seem to have that tendency to deliver earnest, heartfelt and vulnerable music while splicing in the best parts of classic rock n' roll. Talk To Angels offer a melodic take on the artform and while there's potential and sincerity evident on This Broken Home, the record veers just off-co...

British bands seem to have that tendency to deliver earnest, heartfelt and vulnerable music while splicing in the best parts of classic rock n' roll. Talk To Angels offer a melodic take on the artform and while there's potential and sincerity evident on This Broken Home, the record veers just off-course by trying to bring out too much melody and harmony, when all that was needed was for the record to play on its strengths.

Vocalist Craig Kaye, is dynamic throughout and has a great voice. The first impressions are flattering when "Brain Man" begins, as it has the best elements of that typical indie/brit-rock/alternative sound that Arctic Monkeys and such have carved out. Kaye's flow is phenomenal and clean throughout. The song segues nicely into "Hickory Dickory," which take slightly heavier elements not unlike early Manchester Orchestra and Brand New and add them to the mix.



Things then start to wander a bit. The record's spine has a formulaic stance, dwelling too much on overt melodies which wasn't needed given that Kaye's voice was already covering that aspect. The influences of bands like Muse, Franz Ferdinand, Modest Mouse, Interpol, Kasabian and Vampire Weekend all shuffle in and out as the record gets a bit too campy and convoluted for its own good. In their own emotional interpretations, Talk To Angels slightly lose the plot here trying to incorporate all of those diverging influences. It doesn't seem natural and organic at all; "Enemies Closer" highlights this.

There's a lot to ingest on This Broken Home and Talk To Angels could have streamlined their sound a bit more. The record does have its moments–you also get a sense of what could have been when "I Am King Here" spins off with a cool, folky blend–but much of it is fairly derailing. The sentiment and edgy, warm sound are recognizable, and Kaye's talent as a vocalist is undeniable, but there's too much meandering that takes away substantial value from This Broken Home.