Their / They're / There - Their / They're / There [EP] (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

Their / They're / There

Their / They're / There: Their / They're / There [EP]

Their / They're / There [EP] (2013)

Polyvinyl Records


3.5
With Pet Symmetry out of the way for the time being, it's time to retroactively delve into Evan Weiss' other other band, Their / They're / There. In addition to Weiss (Into It. Over It.), this project features Mike Kinsella (Owen, Owls, Cap'n Jazz, American Football) and Matthew Frank (Loose Lips Si...

With Pet Symmetry out of the way for the time being, it's time to retroactively delve into Evan Weiss' other other band, Their / They're / There. In addition to Weiss (Into It. Over It.), this project features Mike Kinsella (Owen, Owls, Cap'n Jazz, American Football) and Matthew Frank (Loose Lips Sink Ships) and make no mistake, the Kinsella force is strong with this one. Between the intricate guitar noodling, mathy percussion and smooth vocals–even the lens flares and landscape (and lack of band name) on the artwork are prototypical–this EP is about as ??90s midwestern emo as can be. Prototypical, however, isn't a detractor when it comes to the six tracks here, as they're often quite strong.

"Their / They're / Therapy" is a rousing opener that's calculatedly chaotic in its beginnings, with a nice breakdown that goes from quiet to loud rather seamlessly. The song then dovetails into a distortion-heavy bass jam; the dissonance shouldn't work here, but it does. The tricks continues on "Concession Speech Writer," which succeeds in being really, really catchy despite the band sounding like they're all simultaneously soloing. Speaking of solos, the guitar soloing in "Fit Your Life Into a Grid" adds some unexpected flash, as if the band needed it in the first place.

The back half of Their / They're / There is filled with quality moments, too: There's some impressive vocal harmonizing and guitar work in "Apocalypse," and athough the acoustic-tinged "572 Cuthbert Ave." will draw comparisons to some of IIOI's 52 Weeks-era material, the virtuoso guitar picking is extremely captivating nonetheless. It also serves as a nice preamble for the distortion-laden intro of closer "End and End," which ends rather abruptly in a wave of distortion, not unlike how it began.

Their / They're / There might be a part-time project still in its infancy, but the songs they've put together on this EP would lead the listener to believe otherwise. It's a testament to the talent these three guys have as veterans and scholars of the ??90s emo scene.