Snapcase - End Transmission (Cover Artwork)

Snapcase

Snapcase: End Transmission

End Transmission (2002)

Victory


5
Snapcase, whose vision is that of progress and enlightenment, have managed to eclipse their last release Designs for Automotion with End Transmission, a true tour de force. This disc is unfathomably deep, insightful, and overflowing with their signature brand of aggressive yet melodic hardcore...

Snapcase, whose vision is that of progress and enlightenment, have managed to eclipse their last release Designs for Automotion with End Transmission, a true tour de force. This disc is unfathomably deep, insightful, and overflowing with their signature brand of aggressive yet melodic hardcore.

A disc dedicated to exploring the human condition and trying to discern where our civilization will be in the year 2071, Transmission is a study in rebellion and escaping oppression. The lyrics on each song, starting with the third track, the Orwellian-tinged "The Beat," deal with every step of the revolution, from the plan on the aptly named "Believe, Revolt," to its aftermath on the impassioned finale "ID/Hindsight." The immense scope of this concept makes for a truly complex and memorable disc.

As for the music, it doesn't get much better than this. The opening song, "Coagulate," with its brutal onslaught of intense rhythms and Daryl Taberski's unique vocals, sets the stage for plenty of songs teeming with aggression and melody galore. The music supplements the motif of rebellion to a tee, as Snapcase plays intense, emotionally-charged hardcore. The feelings expressed through the vocals are likewise mirrored in the instrumentation. For instance, "A Synthesis of Classic Forms" alternates between soft, serene music and muted vocals to a screaming, chaotic sound, and finally ends with a piano solo. And, this disc is extremely diverse, as songs like "New Kata" and "Ten a.m." are intensely emotional but never lacking an edge, while "Believe Revolt," a brutally harsh song with it's pounding drums and blazing guitars, is the epitome of rebellion. These elements are also evident in "Aperture," which highlights Taberski's frantic, screaming vocals and similarly chaotic guitars and unrelenting drums. But, the best song must be "Exile Etiquette, which is a little on the slower side. The tempo along with the distant-sounding vocals give it an unusual aura of mystery.

Thus, End Transmission is a disc for the ages, for not only does Snapcase rock out on every track, but it's revolutionary in its scope and vision. In fact, because of it's grandiose epic style, this could be considered a "rock opera" for the new millennium.