Park - It Won't Snow Where You're Going (Cover Artwork)

Park

Park: It Won't Snow Where You're Going

It Won't Snow Where You're Going (2003)

Lobster


4
If you're the kind of person who notices the lyrics of a song first, prepare to be depressed. Park's second full-length album for Lobster Records will not make you smile after reading the lyric booklet (which has two songs that are number 5, apparently). Topics such as suicide, anger, rage, and de...

If you're the kind of person who notices the lyrics of a song first, prepare to be depressed. Park's second full-length album for Lobster Records will not make you smile after reading the lyric booklet (which has two songs that are number 5, apparently). Topics such as suicide, anger, rage, and depression fill every corner of most of the songs, yet each one manages to clearly and effectively convey its message without seeming depressing just for depression's sake. Songs like the hauntingly graphic "Which Wrist First" paint quite a picture, and prompted the band to add a very appropriate list of organizations that can help people in upsetting times. The eerie-sounding "Conversations With Emily" is something most of us can relate to, as lead vocalist Ladd Mitchell is comforted by being told that "it won't snow where she is going" (New Jersey?).

As for all of you emotionless heathens out threre, fear not: this album delivers a fine dose of mid-tempo hooded-sweatshirt rock. The technical dual guitar parts in "Day One and Counting" and appeasing riffs in "Pomona For Empusa" are similar to label compatriots Staring Back and Over It. Vocally, Ladd has a very unique voice (similar to Millencolin or Midtown), but on certain songs, like "Dear Sweet Impaler", you just have to sit back and wonder if he can hit these notes live. Cameron Webb, who seems to produce every other disc ever made, provides a very crisp recording with his usual stellar drum sound.

"It Won't Snow Where You're Going" is a nice sophmore release from a band you'll probably be hearing a lot more of. Some unnecessary screaming is scattered here and there, and the melodies aren't immediately catchy, but my complaints are few and far between. Check them out live, and give this album a try.