Slapshot - Digital Warfare (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

Slapshot

Slapshot: Digital Warfare

Digital Warfare (2003)

Bridge 9


3.5
This is one those bands that it seems like everyone has heard of, but not as quite as many people have heard. Despite Slapshot's longevity and continued perseverance, this band seems to always get snubbed when people talk about hardcore bands. I'll admit, I've always had a soft spot for these guys...

This is one those bands that it seems like everyone has heard of, but not as quite as many people have heard. Despite Slapshot's longevity and continued perseverance, this band seems to always get snubbed when people talk about hardcore bands. I'll admit, I've always had a soft spot for these guys, considering their name is a reference to my favorite sport and second favorite movie of all time. But, just like any other band, they'd have to have more than just a cool name to get in my good graces. Luckily, I've enjoyed most of the stuff this band has done, and this album is really no different.

The thing that really strikes me about this release is how revitalized this band sounds. Their past few releases weren't really as aggressive as their earlier material, but they sound like a new band on here. Not that they've changed their sound, or that they don't sound seasoned, but they just come out of the gate with the intensity of some kids who are recording their first album. If you haven't heard Slapshot before, they play pretty typical Boston hardcore, fast, unpolished and spiteful, and they do a good job of it. Choke still has the scratchiest voice this side of Dave Manson (obligatory hockey reference #1), and the band still plays with fury.

The lyrics, as would be expected, are pretty ridiculous, but I'm not grading this band based on intellectual merit. If you don't take them too seriously it won't be a problem. You'd think a band that's been around for as long as this one would have more recognition by now. This band has been around almost as long as Mark Messier, but they get treated like Pierre Sevigny (obligatory hockey references #2 and #3).

So there you have it, bands have come and gone, but Slapshot remains standing firm. While their peers seem to disappear with Blaine Lacher-like regularity (obligatory hockey reference #4), Slapshot has stuck around. They might not be Youth of Today or Minor Threat, but they deserve to be respected, if you dig this style of hardcore, you should give this band a listen.