The Mighty Mighty Bosstones - Don't Know How To Party (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones: Don't Know How To Party

Don't Know How To Party (1993)

Mercury


3.5
The band's major label debut, "Don't Know How To Party" was one of the first few albums released in the 90's ska revival. Reviews from that time seem to unfairly judge this album, depending on the reviewer's slant towards ska or punk. Reviewing this today is easier. The style, thanks in part to the ...

The band's major label debut, "Don't Know How To Party" was one of the first few albums released in the 90's ska revival. Reviews from that time seem to unfairly judge this album, depending on the reviewer's slant towards ska or punk. Reviewing this today is easier. The style, thanks in part to the Bosstones, is easier to define and recognise.

Two Taang! albums preceded this: The first sounding like traditional second-wave Ska, the second with more punk influences. This album sees the band consolidating these two influences and developing the now familiar Bosstones-sound. Compared to their later material, the songs here are much less radio-friendly and more metallic. The lyrics are smart and delivered with plenty of energy over Dickey Barret's gravely voice. Some standout songs are "737/Shoe Glue" and a cover of Stiff Little Fingers' "Tin Soldiers." There is also an early version of "Someday I Suppose," the quintessential Bosstones track. The album shows that the band were ahead of their game well before the Ska explosion of 1997.

With such a large catalogue of songs, it is difficult at times difficult to determine which material is a band's "best." The Bosstones' intensive touring offers some clues; the songs from "Don't Know How To Party" are almost always on the set lists, often more so then their songs from the radio hit "Lets Face It." A harder album then what their others, but it works well.

- Adam White (Shindo)