Vehemence - Helping The World To See (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

Vehemence

Vehemence: Helping The World To See

Helping The World To See (2004)

Metal Blade


3.5
Metal Blade has some bands like As I Lay Dying and Unearth that appeal mainly to metalcore fans; they also have plenty of bands like Amon Amarth and the Crown that appeal to a decidedly more metal fan base. Vehemence falls into the latter category, and although they haven't received a ton of attenti...

Metal Blade has some bands like As I Lay Dying and Unearth that appeal mainly to metalcore fans; they also have plenty of bands like Amon Amarth and the Crown that appeal to a decidedly more metal fan base. Vehemence falls into the latter category, and although they haven't received a ton of attention as of yet, their second release for Metal Blade is a strong one.

With a previous Metal Blade release, 2002's God Was Created, and a self-released disc already under their belts, Vehemence is already getting some positive press, and although Helping The World To See isn't a huge breakthrough, it's a step in the right direction and further establishes the band. As is the case with lots of Scandinavian-influenced metal acts, the guitars really carry Vehemence's sound here. The riffs provided by Bjorn Dannov and John Chavez give the songs a very memorable quality, and although this style has obviously been done before, it still works when it is this well executed. Songs like "Trinity Broadcasting (Know Your Enemy)" have an instant appeal, with their rapid-fire speed and catchy riffing, and even the slower songs like "Kill For God" manage to stay interesting. The lack of originality is one of the few things that really take away from this disc; that's not to say they're blatantly stealing riffs or anything like that, but you've heard this style done before. But unlike a lot of the other imitators on this side of the pond, Vehemence pulls this style off really well, and doesn't muddle things with uneasy breakdown or forced melodies that serve no purpose. The drumming of Andy Schroeder is also very strong, and adds another dimension to the band's sound.

This band has loads of talent, and they seem to be on the brink of doing some genuinely impressive things with it. This release is good, but Vehemence needs to put their on twist on the music more often. Still, for its flaws, Helping The World To See is an enjoyable listen and hits a lot harder than the multitude of bands that have been jumping on the metal bandwagon as of late.