Silverstein - Discovering The Waterfront (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

Silverstein

Silverstein: Discovering The Waterfront

Discovering The Waterfront (2005)

Victory


2.5
Silverstein's first full-length, When Broken Is Easily Fixed, didn't even necessarily suffer due to its massively clichéd nature, but more from a faulty, usually cringeworthy lyrical base and a vast array of dragging tempos that rarely, if ever, slipped into or past mid-pacing. The sophomore effort...

Silverstein's first full-length, When Broken Is Easily Fixed, didn't even necessarily suffer due to its massively clich├ęd nature, but more from a faulty, usually cringeworthy lyrical base and a vast array of dragging tempos that rarely, if ever, slipped into or past mid-pacing. The sophomore effort here, Discovering The Waterfront, corrects the last of these attributes to a degree, as well as applying some more interesting guitar work and effects throughout, and providing some seriously competent melodies at plenty of the right times. However, it seems to act more as a profile of a band with potential to master the art of whatever fair-to-deathly rehashed genre they wish to, but instead are catering to a sing-scream trend long worn out and further drowning in an act of watering down.

The band's sound could be roughly described as 70% Yellowcard (see: vocals, healthy amount of catchy punk-pop vigor, digitized harmonizing, even violin work courtesy of YC string man himself Sean Mackin on one track), and 30% Grade (screams, efforts at interspersing hardcore moments). It's unfortunate they concentrate on the most derivative qualities of the former and a weak interpretation of the latter, as there are certainly a few moments that show the outfit proving they carry the chops for more aggressive, inspired times. For example, if not for all the singing and a key emotional segue, "Defend You" could be a rather powerful, mostly straightforward metal/hardcore track, but because of the aforementioned traits it suffers from disappointing pop ingredients forcing its way into the song.

Maybe what I'm trying to say is, Discovering The Waterfront is better than what I was expecting, but not that much better. Silverstein are a moderately talented bunch playing a decent version of a completely tired out style, skimping out on the creativity, lost on a real direction, and still reliant on relationship turmoil anthems worded to just that right level.

STREAM
Smile In Your Sleep
Fist Wrapped In Blood