Razorlight - Up All Night (Cover Artwork)

Razorlight

Razorlight: Up All Night

Up All Night (2004)

Universal


2.5
It is fairly common knowledge that the UK press seemingly hype the death out of a different band every week. Bands like Franz Ferdinand and the Libertines are all over the tabloids and spunked all over television until the next big thing comes along. Razorlight are another example of this. You'll...

It is fairly common knowledge that the UK press seemingly hype the death out of a different band every week. Bands like Franz Ferdinand and the Libertines are all over the tabloids and spunked all over television until the next big thing comes along. Razorlight are another example of this.

You'll probably be familiar with the song "Golden Touch," which was on the radio frequently when released as a single, and it propelled them to the UK's consciousness. Unfortunately, it's probably the best song on the album, which is by no means a good sign. A slow start builds up into an extremely catchy chorus, and is a frustrating example of what Johnny Borell and his band are capable of. However, a lot of the songs on Up All Night drag on and start to blend into one. "Get It And Go" and "Rip It Up" are admittedly energetic tunes, but you can't shake the feeling that it is all too sloppy to truly enjoy them. Razorlight have talent, that cannot be questioned. However, they don't seem to have any good ideas with which to use it, and are merely content to stick to the same template for most of the songs, which is a bit of a shame if you ask me.

That's not to say there are not some good moments on their debut full length; "Rock N Roll Lies" and "In The City" (not a cover of the Jam, unfortunately) got my foot tapping, even if lyrically they leave a lot to be desired, but there are just not enough moments like that. Maybe they will get better; apparently their second album is due out in October of this year, but for now their scuzzy garage rock left little impression on me, save for a couple of standouts.

It appears as if, once again, the hype machine has chosen the wrong targets.