The Lost Patrol - The Lost Patrol Band (Cover Artwork)

The Lost Patrol

The Lost Patrol: The Lost Patrol Band

The Lost Patrol Band (2005)

Burning Heart


4.5
On this, the third installment of Dennis Lyxzén's other project, the sound is vastly headed in a new direction of sound, and this is a wise decision. Upgraded here to be a full band which includes members of Randy, the Deportees, the Regulations, and Sandtröm brothers André (ex-DS-13) and David (...

On this, the third installment of Dennis Lyxzén's other project, the sound is vastly headed in a new direction of sound, and this is a wise decision. Upgraded here to be a full band which includes members of Randy, the Deportees, the Regulations, and Sandtröm brothers André (ex-DS-13) and David (ex-Refused).

His last release under this moniker saw a more lush, stripped-down sound akin to Cat Stevens or Van Morrison, whereas this album has the textures of Big Star, Cheap Trick, the Cars and Elvis Costello. The record kicks off with "Feels Like Drowning," and upon first listen, the listener knows this is going to be a fun, Summer-feel record (although Epitaph delayed it until August in North America). Next up is the single, "Golden Times." This is one of the catchiest songs on the record, thanks in part to an organ line. "Get Ready" probably has the best sing-along chorus, complete with jingle bells that can only emphasize the hook's importance. The next track, "Hanging On," sound like an angry Lyxzén, although I couldn't help notice the similarities in the music and feel to the Cardigans song' "My Favourite Game" (and this is also not a bad thing) and the solo in that song has a mod-`60s sound and tone as if it was lifted from his T(I)NC record Survival Sickness. The next track "Pick Me Up" slows down the record, although not too much, and its chorus will get stuck in one's head as a result of the fantastic vocal harmonies.

"A Girl Like You," with its slight circus-like intro, breaks back into that late `70s / early `80s feel, and the backing vocals only help to emphasize it. "A Dose of You," with its very similar title, gets the same treatment in this review sentence structure-wise, although it sounds nothing at all like its preceeding track. This track injects more tempo into the album, as well as solidifies the album's theme of love, which makes this the third album Dennis has made about Sarah since the breakup (Songs About Running Away and Armed Love being the other two). "Let Me In" kicks everything up a few notched, and just starts out rocking like the album had began, and probably has one of the best bridges I have heard all year, the keyboards rounding it all out. "My Heart is Still a Mess" slows it back down, and is easily one of the top tracks on the record, with its hooks-galore emphasis. The last track, "Can't Stand the Quiet," is another allusion to Survival Sickness, albeit only in the title, harkening one last moment of rockin' out, and contains the catchiest chorus on the album, with the band's attempt to "find a reason to live" and pounding the hook in your head for the final thirty seconds.

With the album's theme obviousy being love, Dennis has proved himself to be a good author on the subject, and the immense talent of his backing band makes this record the best he has released on the subject. In short, this is a damn fine record, and easily one the catchiest and possibly the most under-the-rader release of the year.

Oh yeah, you can dance to it as well.