The Fullblast - Short Controlled Bursts (Cover Artwork)

The Fullblast

The Fullblast: Short Controlled Bursts

Short Controlled Bursts (2005)

Dine Alone


4.5
Despite rhe Fullblast's break-up being unexpected and sucking, Short Controlled Bursts, the band's fifth and final release, couldn't have been a better exit. Despite competition for the best of 2005 being small (in my opinion), something hugely special would be required to beat this, with forty-one ...

Despite rhe Fullblast's break-up being unexpected and sucking, Short Controlled Bursts, the band's fifth and final release, couldn't have been a better exit. Despite competition for the best of 2005 being small (in my opinion), something hugely special would be required to beat this, with forty-one minutes of anger driven by pounding drumming, solid bass lines, thousands of technical guitar riffs all nearly as fast as light and truly remarkable vocal work.

"Spoons, Gats, (White Collar) Prison Tats" immediately sets the blueprint for the album, perfectly demonstrating each individual member's ability and all their abilities combined to produce a masterpiece; it doesn't take a lot to realize why this is the song that got me into the band. The smooth transition into "Stu Ross, Good Dude; Great Dude" signals how this is going to be remarkable album, with speed and more anger from the vocalist correctly titled Ian St. Anger. One of the band members describes him as 'the angriest person I've ever met' and it's understandable through his lyrics;

And I can't survive with all of this uncertainty, wrought with insecurity
For a person full of rage, Ian expresses it through some of the best vocals I've heard -- no awkwardness by his range at all, perfectly fitting and spectacular. The combination of the backing vocals cannot be ignored either. The talent they all possess and their dedication could not be emphasized any more through the ten tracks.

Tracks like "Stu Ross, Good Dude; Great Dude" and "The Song That (Actually) Doesn't End - Part I" really portray the band's ability of creating mayhem with their speed, and bridges in songs such as "Fred's Got Slacks" and "Radio" are alarms for the band to explode. The band chose the right name -- this blast couldn't get any bigger. The band are a perfect example in demonstrating that despite it being easy to purchase studio time and come out with a CD that makes you sound good, energy cannot be bought; it's earned through hard work, and this band have worked damn hard and earned it..

Strong emotions, passion, speed and hugely talented guys = the Fullblast. This album was labelled as essential listening after first listen and not many albums have that ability with me any more; if you haven't heard it, go and get it, but unfortunately the final track title is now false. But as I said, no band could go out in better style.

And one last note, someone should organize a competition for best air drumming to the intro to "The Song That (Actually) Doesn't End - Part II," the drumming on this album is crazy.