Blackpool Lights - This Town's Disaster (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

Blackpool Lights

Blackpool Lights: This Town's Disaster

This Town's Disaster (2006)

Curb Appeal


3.5
Fans who stayed loyal to the Get Up Kids through the otherwise alienating On a Wire and the perceived-by-some-as-pandering Guilt Show are going to find a lot to like about the proper debut from Blackpool Lights, This Town's Disaster. Featuring ex-Get Up Kid Jim Suptic on guitar and lead vocals (as w...

Fans who stayed loyal to the Get Up Kids through the otherwise alienating On a Wire and the perceived-by-some-as-pandering Guilt Show are going to find a lot to like about the proper debut from Blackpool Lights, This Town's Disaster. Featuring ex-Get Up Kid Jim Suptic on guitar and lead vocals (as well an ex-member of theSTART), the band channels a slight alt-country flair รก la Limbeck and a similarly minded bounciness that was quite evident on the latter of the aforementioned albums.

The Lawrence, KS outfit's strength lies outright in their well-crafted songs. Each beg to be sung along to, from Suptic's admirably lively performance in the opening title track to road warrior anthem "Empty Tank" and the slightly melancholy "It's Never About What It's About," which carries a little bit of Cheap Trick swagger. "Crash Sounds" is a powered lullaby of sorts, with nice twinkling guitars but gruff delivery considering. Other places, it's tracks like "Empty Tank" and "Maybe Just Maybe" that reek of 'aw shucks' self-pity, but it's somehow rather endearing, presented in refreshingly honest ways that make it easy to get behind. "Unlucky" is as likeable a closer as they come.

This Town's Disaster isn't hard to decipher, but it's certainly not without charm. A solid first step from both band and label, it's a whole lot of fun and seems to come at the right time of the year despite the sometimes solemn content of its lyrics.

STREAM
This Town's Disaster
Blue Skies
It's Never About What It's About
Unlucky