The Lovekill - These Moments Are Momentum (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

The Lovekill

The Lovekill: These Moments Are Momentum

These Moments Are Momentum (2006)

Astro Magnetics / Eyeball


3.5
I continue to be very impressed with Geoff Rickley's Astro Magnetics label; the Thursday frontman has taken an opportunity squandered by many, and used it to create an imprint with a very real identity and philosophy, and not just not the one you'd expect from the post-hardcore heroes. Instead, with...

I continue to be very impressed with Geoff Rickley's Astro Magnetics label; the Thursday frontman has taken an opportunity squandered by many, and used it to create an imprint with a very real identity and philosophy, and not just not the one you'd expect from the post-hardcore heroes. Instead, with releases from the Valley Arena and the Blackout Pact, the common denominator seems to be a solid punk base. The Valley Arena incorporated rhythmic art-punk like Gang of Four, while the Blackout Pact paid tribute to the distinctive and gritty sound of Hot Water Music.

The Lovekill certainly continues this tradition, keeping a strong `90s base, but infusing it with the sound of heavier art punks like Mission of Burma and Cursive. The band boasts a heavy angularity inherited from both those bands as well as vocals which have that Guy Picciotto-esque sung/spoken quality to them, and sharp, staccato guitars which occasionally wash into melodic leads.

Throughout the recording, the band maintains a relentless tempo, and is refreshingly energetic; tracks like "Palms and Gin" and "These Moments Are Momentum" are injected with a cool energy and strong instrumental performances. "Heart Wires" is another particularly strong track, with a great hook, and a memorable bridge driven by guitarist Jonah Bayer.

Though the album is not just Bayer's despite his wonderful leads, bassist Carla Cherry and drummer Craig Ramsey maintain a rock-solid rhythmic base which keeps everything propelled forward, both creatively and musically.

Words should also be written about Stephen Pederson (Criteria) and his exemplary production; though the record was recorded in what the label described as a "damp basement, " you'd never know it from the sound of the record, which is warm and manages to transcribe both the band's angularity and strong low end.

With a sound that pays tribute to the definitive sounds of early Dischord and Touch and Go, and strong songwriting throughout, the Lovekill have assembled a terrific debut, and another memorable release from Astro Magnetics. Well-recommended.