J Church / Minority Blues Band - Split [7 inch] (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

J Church / Minority Blues Band

J Church / Minority Blues Band: Split [7 inch]

Split [7 inch] (2006)

Underground Communiqué


3.5
Though rumblings about it surfaced nearly two years ago, it wasn't until last April that J Church and Japan's long-defunct Minority Blues Band finally released their split 7 inch. For those who just can't wait for new material from J Church, it's a great stop along the way to their upcoming full-len...

Though rumblings about it surfaced nearly two years ago, it wasn't until last April that J Church and Japan's long-defunct Minority Blues Band finally released their split 7 inch. For those who just can't wait for new material from J Church, it's a great stop along the way to their upcoming full-length The Horror of Life, due out in a few weeks on No Idea.

Both J Church and Minority Blues Band bring an original and a cover to the table. J Church's original, "Aeroplane Angel" won't surprise fans of the band, although it has a slower tempo than their usually more hectic pop-punk -- then again, I've always found J Church to be just a little slower than I'd prefer. Lance Hahn's vocals during the verses are pleasantly lazy-sounding while the chorus has a real throwback indie-rock-circa-1993 feel to it, which is all the more authenticated with the song playing through a record player. J Church's second track is a cover of Wire's "Ex Lion Tamer." While the song's structure comes off as awkward at times, J Church is somehow able to give it an appealing, simple pop-punk frame that I give it credit for.

Japan's Minority Blues Band broke up a few years ago and their contributions are leftovers from their last sessions. Their original song, "Speak Same Old News, Sing Same Old Songs" appropriately follows the style of J Church's, although with a sped-up tempo and much hookier chorus. However, the production of their songs leave something to be desired. Their second song is a cover of Newtown Neurotic's "My Death," which they throw out in a style similar to Green Day's Kerplunk! days except with snottier sounding verses.

It's a humble little 7" for sure, but if you like melodic pop-punk, you really can't go wrong picking this one up.