The Creepshow - Sell Your Soul (Cover Artwork)

The Creepshow

The Creepshow: Sell Your Soul

Sell Your Soul (2006)

Stereo Dynamite


4
Whenever I talk to people about this band, I find that most people compare them to the already famous Horrorpops. For the purpose of this review and so you (the reader) will be able to get an idea of this band since most people haven't heard them, I shall draw comparisons to the Horrorpops as well. ...

Whenever I talk to people about this band, I find that most people compare them to the already famous Horrorpops. For the purpose of this review and so you (the reader) will be able to get an idea of this band since most people haven't heard them, I shall draw comparisons to the Horrorpops as well.

Based on different elements of each band (which I will discuss), I think that the Creepshow is a far better band and act. The singer of the Creepshow, Sarah "Sin" Blackwood, easily surpasses that of her counterpart Patricia Day. The bassist for the Horrorpops (also Patricia Day) isn't anywhere on the same level (or even close for that matter) to that of Sean "Sickboy" McNab from the Creepshow. Many people say that the reason for this is that Patricia sings lead and he only does back-up vocals, but when you look at Kim Nekroman (guitarist for the Horrorpops and bassist for the hugely popular Nekromantix who is married to Patricia and taught her to play bass) you can't say that is true because when he sings in Nekromantix and plays bass he does a fantastic job, hands down.

Continuing, Sarah Blackwood is a more than decent guitarist for her group, playing a very `50s sounding guitar, though I do believe that Nekroman is a bit more skilled than her at that instrument (ironic because Patricia Day taught her husband how to play guitar). Matt "Pomade" Gee (drummer for Creepshow) utilizes every aspect of his drumset playing tons of rolls and tempo changes frequently throughout this album. Niedermeier (percussionist for Horrorpops) is a decent drummer but doesn't add that extra element of spark and energy that Gee does.

On top of all this, the Creepshow incorporate wonderfully welcome keyboard parts in their songs that fit superbly with the whole `50s-era eerie psycho-punk band ensemble.

While all of what I just said is completely subjective, it will be hard for people to argue with the live performances of the bands. While the Horrorpops do have go-go dancers who distract audience members from the musicians in the group as they shake their pompoms, the Creepshow (the actual members of the band) entertain the crowd with wild antics, great special effects, awesome showmanship and skillful playing, and unbelievable energy that never ceases to amaze me. The Creepshow are no doubt better live than the Horrorpops.

Now that I'm past the band-to-band comparison I can finally talk about the actual album. It starts off with a great introduction entitled "Sermon" that definitely sets you off on a spooky journey. The next track is "Creatures of the Night" (one of the singles of the record), setting the tone for a great album.

The main thing about the Creepshow's music are their choruses; they thrive on choruses. Whether it be a hardcore fast-paced song or a slower more rockabilly tune, every chorus is a great sing-along section with energetic backing vocals provided by McNab and Rowles, respectively. The album progresses covering every aspect of the ??billy' genres from psychobilly to rockabilly to gothabilly to hellbilly.

Seriously, if you like psychobilly bands with great female vocals you'll love this album and this band. It really is a must-have for fans of this genre. Sorry to all the Horrorpops fans I may have offended or pissed off; oh well, get over it.