Anti-Flag / Against All Authority - Split [7 inch] (Cover Artwork)

Anti-Flag / Against All Authority

Anti-Flag / Against All Authority: Split [7 inch]

Split [7 inch] (1996)

A-F / Records of Rebellion


3.5
While browsing through my local record store, I came across this gem that I wasn't even aware had existed. The first thing that struck me was it was clearly from Anti-Flag's Die for the Government recordings as Andy Flag was on the cover. Sure enough, upon looking inside it turns out these are the f...

While browsing through my local record store, I came across this gem that I wasn't even aware had existed. The first thing that struck me was it was clearly from Anti-Flag's Die for the Government recordings as Andy Flag was on the cover. Sure enough, upon looking inside it turns out these are the final recordings with said bassist.

A-F's side opens up with "The Truth," a pretty good song that rails against corporate media. The record then goes into "Anti-Violent," sung by Andy, and sounds along the same lines as songs from Die for the Government such as "Rotten Future" and "Kill the Rich," a sound that is absent from later A-F records. As the title would suggest, it is bashing the violent thugs at shows. A-F closes their side with "Daddy Was a Rich Man Pt. 2" which is a shorter, faster version of the last track on the Government album. The speed is definitely an improvement, but lacks the hilarious obscenities that Justin Sane says in the orginal version. Overall, the boys do a solid job on their side. Man, I miss old Anti-Flag...

I've really only heard a handful of Against All Authority songs, but I really enjoy what I have heard. The cover art for their side features a drawing of a mohawked punk strangling a police officer, which is just cool overall. When the first song "Nothing to Lose" kicks off, I made sure my turntable was on the right speed, as I was blown away by how incredibly fast their bassist sings. The song sets the stage for the rest of their contributions, as all are incredibly played and sung at breakneck speed. The only problem is the songs all kind of sound the same. They're all very fast street punk that goes into a ska breakdown with their horns all around the middle. Despite this, "When It Comes Down to You" and "Haymarket Square" will still get you skanking/thrashing/throwing shit around with their intense energy.

If you manage to come across this 7", I'd recommend picking it up for the hell of it. I managed to get it for a couple bucks along with the Dropick Murphys / Oxymoron Split 7" and it was worth every penny.