Sights and Sounds - Sights and Sounds (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

Sights and Sounds

Sights and Sounds: Sights and Sounds

Sights and Sounds (2007)

Smallman


2.5
Let's face it: side projects are all the rage these days. It seems like everyone and their guitar tech has a new band springing up with press releases that talk about making music with "less restrictions" or "no boundaries," while being sure to emphasize that even though it's a debut release, it won...

Let's face it: side projects are all the rage these days. It seems like everyone and their guitar tech has a new band springing up with press releases that talk about making music with "less restrictions" or "no boundaries," while being sure to emphasize that even though it's a debut release, it won't feel like one because of all of the musical experience held within the band members.

Sights & Sounds' debut EP may feature a less restricting sound than the members' other bands (Comeback Kid, Sick City, The Getaway), but it still certainly feels like a debut release. Whether this can be attributed to less-than-stellar production or to a lack of focus is debatable, but for everything these boys have gotten right, it is not without its mistakes.

This EP runs for only six songs, but as one is an instrumental intermission of sorts, and another is more or less an outro with a single line repeated, that only leaves four "real" tracks. The opener, "Reconcile" is a post-hardcore piece that was probably the most familiar for vocalist/guitarist Andrew Neufeld (Comeback Kid, Figure Four), yet while the track is the most intense and aggressive on the EP, it also drags on a bit too long and loses its impact.

The impact is further lost when the second track ends up sounding like a completely new band. This track perhaps takes a bit of influence from labelmates Moneen with a more melodic emo rock vibe, keyboard and all. It's arguably the strongest track on the disc, and it is what actually sets the pace for the rest of the EP. "Lee's on Fridays" features catchy utilization of dual vocals in the chorus, and also implements a few keys and an infusion of pop-rock. "The Only Time" strays a bit from the previous two songs in that it is more or less a pop-punk piece, but it is extremely catchy and still manages to fit in well on the disc.

Aside from the initial misstep that sticks out like a sore thumb, this EP shows a promising band that could produce some interesting tunes in the near future -- that is, if the members can ever find time for it.