Youth of Togay - Tossed Salad Days [12 inch] / The Dongs We Bury [7 inch] (Cover Artwork)
Staff Review

Youth of Togay

Youth of Togay: Tossed Salad Days [12 inch] / The Dongs We Bury [7 inch]

Tossed Salad Days [12 inch] / The Dongs We Bury [7 inch] (2007)

Rejected / FNS


3.5
Youth of Togay was formed in the winter of 2005 with the intention to address the rampant homophobia in hardcore, finding a place alongside similarly parodic acts like Gayrilla Biscuits and Black Fag. However, one needs to note that despite the highly comedic nature of their songs, they're rather se...

Youth of Togay was formed in the winter of 2005 with the intention to address the rampant homophobia in hardcore, finding a place alongside similarly parodic acts like Gayrilla Biscuits and Black Fag. However, one needs to note that despite the highly comedic nature of their songs, they're rather serious about the issues, even donating 20% of the sales of their Tossed Salad Days LP to the Gay-Straight Alliance.

For those who still can't figure it out, Youth of Togay play hardcore of the youth crew, straight-edge variety with blatant late `80s vibes. Well, except for the proud homosexual slant, which often goes into sexual detail. On The Dongs We Bury, for example, "Never Going Back" features the choice couplet, "Now I go from door to door / Suckin' more dicks than Mandy Moore!" Oral sex is a very common theme for Youth of Togay.

Though two of the songs on Dongs are also on Tossed Salad Days -- a 12" (lolz) compilation of songs from various records -- "The Gaychinist," a parody of Have Heart's "The Machinist," is the centerpiece. The way controversial track is well-performed, not to mention mildly amusing. I'd wager jokes about Bridge 9 having a stick up their ass have been made plenty.

Highlights on Tossed Salad Days also include a wicked adaptation of Champion's "The Truth," played here as "The Goop" (you can probably figure it out on your own) and "Gay Edge Revenge" (Project X's gay-ified "Straight Edge Revenge"). The proficiency displayed in songs like these, as well as a handful of originals, show that you might to be tempted to label Youth of Togay as gimmicky, but you can't dismiss their musical skills; these guys know how to play their instruments, and how to play good, solid fast hardcore jams. Various vocalists give things a good variety, too.

While perhaps lacking the replayability of larger acts like Good Clean Fun or Limp Wrist, and hardly bringing anything to the table that their predecessors, Pansy Division, didn't already, Youth of Togay are certainly good for a few listens and would make for an imaginably entertaining basement show.

STREAM
Make the Change
Pig Pile
Get Gay