NOFX - The Longest Line (Cover Artwork)

NOFX

NOFX: The Longest Line

The Longest Line (1992)

Fat Wreck Chords


4.5
I was checking out NOFX's Punknews band page when, to my disbelief, I saw that this EP hasn't been reviewed yet. This EP is a milestone for NOFX! It was their first release on Fat Wreck, the first release with El Hefe and an initial taste of the fantastic material that would follow in their career. ...

I was checking out NOFX's Punknews band page when, to my disbelief, I saw that this EP hasn't been reviewed yet. This EP is a milestone for NOFX! It was their first release on Fat Wreck, the first release with El Hefe and an initial taste of the fantastic material that would follow in their career.

The EP starts off with a retarded joke that I personally didn't grasp for some time. But they make up for it immediately with the classic: "The Death of John Smith." This song is well-written all around. It's fast, has great lyrics, well-placed harmonies and a great syncopated breakdown that shows off the band as a whole. El Hefe sings solo on the bridge, which is half-timed, giving a sense of buildup for the final verse/chorus.

The title track is arguably the catchiest song on the EP. It's witty, simple and fun. "The Longest Line" is a step out of pace (at the time) from the usual straightforward skatepunk NOFX was writing. It's stripped down in terms of tempo and musicianship. But nonetheless, you'll find it suck in your head after a couple of listens.

The next two songs took a few listens to win me over. "Stranded" is a sleeper for sure. It's one of those songs that takes a while to build. But you once you get there, you see what all the fuss is about. The "ahhhh"s on the chorus are great. The segue from the breakdown into the solo is awesome.

"Remnants" is easier to get into then the previous song. The verses have great melodies that stick with you. NOFX does a great job of building up in this one. It's up and down to get into the second verse, as well as getting into the solo and then eases off into the the last verse. They finally slow it down, get a little metal and pull out the artificial harmonics for the outro.

To finish off the EP is the amusing reggae track, "Kill All the White Man." I would have to say that the repetition and humor of this song will have you singing it for weeks. El Hefe sings this one and does a great job with the faux-Rasta accent. It's pretty straightforward in terms of music and speeds up for a more punk rock outro. I personally think they could have chopped off some bars at the end. But hey, I thought that about "The Decline" as well...

I would recommend picking up this EP. It's classic NOFX. The production is pretty much on par with White Trash, Two Heebs and a Bean and the songs hold some steady longevity.