Exit She Calls - Out of Reach (Cover Artwork)

Exit She Calls

Exit She Calls: Out of Reach

Out of Reach (2010)

Scorpion


3.5
I have always loved female vocals in punk rock. From newer bands like Lemuria to one of my old favorites, Discount, there is something refreshing in both the smooth clarity that most female vocalists have and the different perspective that female-penned vocals reflect as opposed to the typical dude ...

I have always loved female vocals in punk rock. From newer bands like Lemuria to one of my old favorites, Discount, there is something refreshing in both the smooth clarity that most female vocalists have and the different perspective that female-penned vocals reflect as opposed to the typical dude topics and perspective. It's not that female-fronted bands should be considered separately because of the difference in gender, but it's the effect the difference in gender has on the final product that makes for a different experience for the listener.

Exit She Calls is a young band from New Jersey that plays a style reminiscent of the early 2000s poppy emo style, sounding like a mix of Further Seems Forever with early Coheed and Cambria that actually makes me nostalgic for that period, which is surprising considering how young the members of this band are. At least they're not pandering to that Absolutepunk.net style of nĂ¼-emo-pop, but playing a style that has depth to it.

Vocalist Kristia Moya is reminiscent of Kay Hanley with some of the stylistic tendencies of Hayley Williams of Paramore. She has a very pleasing voice that is just a little rough around the edges. There is some definite inconsistency on this record, but when it clicks, like on the chorus of the standout track, "Little Things," she sounds almost as good as the big name female singers doing this style.

While the clear focus of this band is the vocals, the playing itself is skillful and enjoyable. The drumming is solid and consistent, while the guitars are often busy and succinctly performed. Similar to the aforementioned bands, there is palm-muting, off-beat accents, swirling delayed guitars, octave leads and other stylistic hallmarks of that era.

Overall, this is an imperfect but enjoyable one, showing a band that knows how to write a good song, but really displaying a potential for greater things in the future.