Far From Finished - East Side Of Nowhere (Cover Artwork)

Far From Finished

Far From Finished: East Side Of Nowhere

East Side Of Nowhere (2005)

GMM


5
Remember the feelings you had when you first heard an album that changed your whole perspective of music? The one that got you into punk rock. The one where you knew every word to every song. The one that had so much energy that you just couldn't stand still listening to it. After the first listen o...

Remember the feelings you had when you first heard an album that changed your whole perspective of music? The one that got you into punk rock. The one where you knew every word to every song. The one that had so much energy that you just couldn't stand still listening to it. After the first listen of East Side Of Nowhere (Far From Finished's debut record on GMM Records), all those feelings came rushing back. The urgency, the passion, the ass-kicking that you want to unload on the world. Yeah baby, this is what it is all about.

Although this is the first proper release for Far From Finished, they have some experienced hands on board; Rob (ex-Street Dog guitarist and main songwriter of Savin Hill) joins Far From Finished and adds some nice guitar work, and Mark from the Ducky Boys plays bass on the album, except on "Dusty Shelves" where Spike Katz from the King's of Nuthin' slaps the stand-up bass.

Far From Finished give you 10 songs that completely ROCK! We are talking about some hard-hitting armament (the US Military Complex has got nothin' compared to this). Far From Finished say they've been influenced by a lot of the early punk out of Britain (Pistols, Cock Sparrer), so they sound a bit like the US Bombs and the Bastards. They use a minimalistic approach to kick your ass and don't hide behind unnecessary production; basically, no bullshit. The music is an aggressive wall of sound (except on "The Bastard's Way," this is a toe-tappin' acoustic number with stand-up bass), the vocals are a little gruff with a touch of snot (good shit), and the choruses have catchy as hell group melodies. Lyrically, some of the songs ("Dusty Shelves," "Forgive Me Father," "The Bastard's Way") remind me of Social Distortion but with more from the gut raw emotion.

I've seen these guys a couple of times now and am amazed that they caught their intensity of their live set on this disc. Brilliant. Pick it up at Interpunk or grab a copy when you see them out touring.