Nirvana - Nevermind (Cover Artwork)
Staff Pick

Nirvana

Nirvana: Nevermind

Nevermind (1991)

Geffen


5
I'm sure there will be a shitload of people criticizing my decision to write a review for this album. We can all certainly question the true "punk" merit of Nirvana's music. Grunge? Punk? Alternative....(god I hate that phrase) One undeniable fact is this...Nirvana's music had an impact on music ...

I'm sure there will be a shitload of people criticizing my decision to write a review for this album. We can all certainly question the true "punk" merit of Nirvana's music. Grunge? Punk? Alternative....(god I hate that phrase) One undeniable fact is this...Nirvana's music had an impact on music that most band's could never even fathom accomplishing.

I remember first hearing the raw, driven album "Bleach" back in 1990. Good music, which lead me to curiously anticipate the sophomore following "Nevermind" in 1991. Never would have imagined what would happen next.

Summer 1991- I hear "Smells Like Teen Spirit" for the first time on a college radio station. Much more polished than anything on "Bleach" but amazing bass lines, hooks and guitar solo. I soon became part of the masses that purchased "Nevermind". To this day it stands in the unique section of my collection that I can listen to from start to finish, singing along, screaming along, (and occasionally dancing along). A barrage of singles from the album were to come. "Lithium", with its incredible, melodic bass line, Kurt's trademark drug-influenced lyrics and Dave Grohl's amazing beats to keep the entire work flowing. "In Bloom", a slower yet, remarkable piece, with one of the best music videos I have ever seen. "Come As You Are", with the eerie guitar riff and the famous words that would come to mind whenever hearing about Kurt's death, "....I swear that I don't have a gun..."

The album pounces on with Dave Grohl's horrifically off-key intro to "Territorial Pissings". This track (along with "In Utero"'s 'Tourette's') truly captures the punk spirit in the group with its frantic drumbeat, repetitive power-chord slashing and scream along lyrics. I'm gonna go out on a limb and assume that almost everyone reading this review either owns or has at least heard this album. I don't see much need to give a complete description of every song. Looking at punk of yesteryear and now, its easy to see how Nirvana made their mark. For some, it was the Ramones, Sex Pistols and the Clash that introduced punkrock into their lives. For others, including myself, it was Minor Threat, Black Flag and Bad Religion that brought forth the music I hold such a passion for. For many it was Nirvana, Green Day and Rancid. And even today we see a new breed, Blink 182, Sum 41 and Good Charlotte introducing the masses. While many of these bands hold credentials over others (you guys can argue that all you want below), its difficult to deny that any of them have not impacted punkrock in a serious manner one way or the other.