Andrew Jackson Jihad - Only God Can Judge Me (Cover Artwork)

Andrew Jackson Jihad

Andrew Jackson Jihad: Only God Can Judge Me

Only God Can Judge Me (2008)

Plan-It-X


4
First of all, I absolutely loved 2007's People Who Can Eat People Are the Luckiest People In the World, and Only God Can Judge Me seems to pick up just where People left off: short songs, graphic lyrics and a folky twang matched by few making music in the punk scene right now. For those unfami...

First of all, I absolutely loved 2007's People Who Can Eat People Are the Luckiest People In the World, and Only God Can Judge Me seems to pick up just where People left off: short songs, graphic lyrics and a folky twang matched by few making music in the punk scene right now.

For those unfamilar, Andrew Jackson Jihad are a two man "folk-punk" group consisting of acoustic guitar and standup bass. Following the trend of the album title, their most recent full-length contained songs about the most strange, yet extremely interesting topics. Lyrics about death, racism and other sometimes untouchable things juxtaposed with jangling feel-good folk jams. As for Only God Can Judge Me, it just adds more points onto the band's already successful scoreboard.

The lyrics are just as abrasive and blatant; "Human Kittens" discusses the death of small animals as a metaphor and "Candle in the Wind" states "I want to eat red, red, meat / I want to feel it digesting inside of my tummy / I support animal testing / I'd kill a kitten to save a human being." At times it is uncomfortable to listen to, but at the same time it is difficult to stop. In contrast to People, God has more slower tempos all over. The middle of the eight-song set ("Guilt: the Song" and "Candle in the Wind") are much less frantic than the majority of People, with impressive results. AJJ show that they are not a one-trick pony in this way.

There isn't much to say about this release that hasn't already been said about the band. If you are easily offended by relatively graphic subject matter, stay away. If you don't enjoy a good relaxing folk jam, stay away. However, if you want to hear one of the most promising young bands in folk-punk follow up a stellar full-length with a more fleshed-out EP, then you've come to the right place.