Bullet Treatment - The Mistake (Cover Artwork)

Bullet Treatment

Bullet Treatment: The Mistake

The Mistake (2006)

Think Fast!


4.5
Take the reckless intensity of Black Flag, the breakneck speed of Minor Threat and the brilliant musical structures of early Adolescents. Now throw it all in a pot, set that shit on fire and let it explode in a blaze of glory. Your end result would be The Mistake by a little-known band called Bullet...

Take the reckless intensity of Black Flag, the breakneck speed of Minor Threat and the brilliant musical structures of early Adolescents. Now throw it all in a pot, set that shit on fire and let it explode in a blaze of glory. Your end result would be The Mistake by a little-known band called Bullet Treatment. If you aren't already familiar, Bullet Treatment is the brainchild of mainstay guitarist Chuck "D.C." Dietrich. The rest of the band consists of over 20 rotating members from acts including Rise Against, Suicidal Tendencies and the Bronx. Clocking in at 23 minutes, Bullet Treatment packs quite a punch with its second studio album.

The sound embodies everything you want and more in a hardcore punk album. Momentum bursts into fury as opening track "Illustrations" sets the stage for what's to follow. Rollicking drumbeats and thrashing guitars fill your ears with thoughts that can only be described as violent. The songs don't only sound unique--they are also infectious. "Pointless Conversation" and standout track "Grindstone" make use of catchy choruses that exceed expectations and make an impression on the listener, all the while maintaining a beat worthy of punching floors, walls, small children, etc...

I also can't forget to mention the talents of Bronx singer Matt Caughthran who provided his voice for The Mistake. Caughthran is what makes this album stand out from other punk records. His throat rips through each song with a level of frustration that rivals Damaged-era Henry Rollins. "I WANT, TO FEEL, EVERY-THIINGG!" he painfully screams on "Coke Nose," giving just a taste of his manic vocal style. Speaking of the Flag, the last track "The Mistake" is kind of reminiscent of "Damaged I," full of random shouts and screams being played to distorted music, which is a nice throwback to the '80s classic.

The sound quality, while not the best, is certainly the most well-produced effort Bullet Treatment has released prior to the Designated Vol. 1 7". It displays that raw energy feel that comes standard with any great hardcore album.

All in all, I would say that this album is a MUST-LISTEN. I was actually surprised that there was no review for this album on the Org considering how genuinely crafted and...and... Fuck, this album is just fantastic. Not only is this one of my favorite albums, I'd say that this is one of the definitive hardcore records of the 2000s. It's sad to see that this album did not receive enough attention because Bullet Treatment has great potential, and The Mistake really proves their craftsmanship as musicians.